Poster Title

Knowledge of Symptoms Indicating Risk of Maternal Mortality in New Mothers of Low Income

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

University of Louisville

KY House District #

24

KY Senate District #

14

Department

Nursing Department

Abstract

Objective: Study Aims: What do low-income, new mothers know about symptoms indicating risk of maternal mortality? What actions would they take if they experienced symptoms?

Design: The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional.

Setting: Participants came from an academic health sciences center.

Sample: A convenience sample (n=40) was recruited. Eligibility requirements included: Delivered live child, English speaking, 18 years of age or older.

Methods: After IRB and site approval, new mothers were asked the following questions:

1. What symptoms could a new mother experience after hospital discharge? (9 danger symptoms listed from national safety bundles.)

2. What action would you take if you experienced symptoms above?

3. How long after birth could a new mother have complications from the birth?

Results: New mothers were unfamiliar with symptoms of blood clots (63%), feelings that you may harm yourself or your baby (58%), and fever (65%). Most would notify their MD (92%) if they recognized the risk. 57% did not realize that complications could occur up to a year after birth.

Conclusion/Implications for nursing practice: New mothers are unaware of symptoms indicating risk of maternal mortality, providing a foundation for the development and testing of interventions by collaborations between nurse researchers, educators, and practitioners.

Keywords: maternal mortality, patient education, low-income

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Knowledge of Symptoms Indicating Risk of Maternal Mortality in New Mothers of Low Income

Objective: Study Aims: What do low-income, new mothers know about symptoms indicating risk of maternal mortality? What actions would they take if they experienced symptoms?

Design: The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional.

Setting: Participants came from an academic health sciences center.

Sample: A convenience sample (n=40) was recruited. Eligibility requirements included: Delivered live child, English speaking, 18 years of age or older.

Methods: After IRB and site approval, new mothers were asked the following questions:

1. What symptoms could a new mother experience after hospital discharge? (9 danger symptoms listed from national safety bundles.)

2. What action would you take if you experienced symptoms above?

3. How long after birth could a new mother have complications from the birth?

Results: New mothers were unfamiliar with symptoms of blood clots (63%), feelings that you may harm yourself or your baby (58%), and fever (65%). Most would notify their MD (92%) if they recognized the risk. 57% did not realize that complications could occur up to a year after birth.

Conclusion/Implications for nursing practice: New mothers are unaware of symptoms indicating risk of maternal mortality, providing a foundation for the development and testing of interventions by collaborations between nurse researchers, educators, and practitioners.

Keywords: maternal mortality, patient education, low-income