Poster Title

Honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder in the U.S.A

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

Kentucky State University

KY House District #

57

KY Senate District #

7

Department

College of Agriculture Food and Sustainable Systems

Abstract

Examining Honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder in The U.S.A

Gabriel Stone, Buddhi Gyawali, Jeremy Sandifer

In the world we live in today, and for hundreds of years beforehand, mankind has relied on honeybees to perform plant pollination. Honeybee pollination plays a vital role in producing food for humans, animals, and various types of insects. Based on this understanding in terms of the honeybee's ability to perform pollination, it is very clear to fathom what our reality would be like there were suddenly no more bees. Essentially it would cause global starvation, economic disasters, and overall strife. It is frightening to realize that colony collapse disorder (the systematic breakdown /disappearance of bees), has been increased recently in many parts of the United States. This phenomenon involves the continuation of bees dying off, and hives becoming barren. Multiple factors such as pesticides, disease, parasites, and extreme weather patterns are reported to be the major culprits for CCD. This study examines the spatial trend and pattern of CCD and it's relationship with factors such as temperature, precipitation, pesticide use, and land cover change. Data related to honey bee population, pesticides, temperature, precipitation, and land use change were compiled from 1990 to 2016 and spatial analysis were conducted at the state and regional level. This study reveals that temperature, and precipitation are key contributors to CCD which has a spatial pattern of disorder. Climate and extreme weather change paterns have been found to have a direct effect on the survival, and sustainability of the honey bees especially in the southern United States.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder in the U.S.A

Examining Honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder in The U.S.A

Gabriel Stone, Buddhi Gyawali, Jeremy Sandifer

In the world we live in today, and for hundreds of years beforehand, mankind has relied on honeybees to perform plant pollination. Honeybee pollination plays a vital role in producing food for humans, animals, and various types of insects. Based on this understanding in terms of the honeybee's ability to perform pollination, it is very clear to fathom what our reality would be like there were suddenly no more bees. Essentially it would cause global starvation, economic disasters, and overall strife. It is frightening to realize that colony collapse disorder (the systematic breakdown /disappearance of bees), has been increased recently in many parts of the United States. This phenomenon involves the continuation of bees dying off, and hives becoming barren. Multiple factors such as pesticides, disease, parasites, and extreme weather patterns are reported to be the major culprits for CCD. This study examines the spatial trend and pattern of CCD and it's relationship with factors such as temperature, precipitation, pesticide use, and land cover change. Data related to honey bee population, pesticides, temperature, precipitation, and land use change were compiled from 1990 to 2016 and spatial analysis were conducted at the state and regional level. This study reveals that temperature, and precipitation are key contributors to CCD which has a spatial pattern of disorder. Climate and extreme weather change paterns have been found to have a direct effect on the survival, and sustainability of the honey bees especially in the southern United States.