Poster Title

Comparison of Human vs. Technological Identification of Blood Products

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

98

KY Senate District #

18

Department

Department of Nursing

Abstract

This study focuses on the Comparison of Human Versus Technological Identification of Blood Products in relation to patient safety. Blood transfusions have the most resemblance to an organ transplant that a nurse can perform without depending on physician assistance. Being a critical procedure that could save a life, minimizing reactions and preventing errors is essential to positive patient outcomes. The objective of this study is to analyze human and technological methods for identifying a blood product with the patient in need to encourage safer methods for blood administration with fewer transfusion reactions. We have used national recommendations and blood transfusion protocols at a large hospital in an urban area to determine whether technology has surpassed human competencies in verifying blood type during administration. We have also used a synthesis of both national and international studies to compare these two methods of administration. Overall, technology improves patient safety but alone is not an adequate substitute for human verification of the proper blood product.

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Comparison of Human vs. Technological Identification of Blood Products

This study focuses on the Comparison of Human Versus Technological Identification of Blood Products in relation to patient safety. Blood transfusions have the most resemblance to an organ transplant that a nurse can perform without depending on physician assistance. Being a critical procedure that could save a life, minimizing reactions and preventing errors is essential to positive patient outcomes. The objective of this study is to analyze human and technological methods for identifying a blood product with the patient in need to encourage safer methods for blood administration with fewer transfusion reactions. We have used national recommendations and blood transfusion protocols at a large hospital in an urban area to determine whether technology has surpassed human competencies in verifying blood type during administration. We have also used a synthesis of both national and international studies to compare these two methods of administration. Overall, technology improves patient safety but alone is not an adequate substitute for human verification of the proper blood product.