Title

Attitudes Predicting Patriotism and Nationalism

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Maria Vazquez

Second Project Mentor & Advisor(s)

Jana Hackathorn

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

Two important parts to national identification are patriotism (positively identifying with one’s own country) and nationalism (i.e., contempt for countries other than one’s own; Citrin, Wong, & Duff, 2001; Williams, Foster, & Krohn, 2008). Although these two constructs are closely interrelated, they are separate. Of particular interest is whether one can predict increased nationalism or patriotism, with personality variables, (i.e., core conservatism and smugness) as well as other related attitudes, such as attitudes toward internationalism, civil liberties, a world government, and desire for punishment. The current study examined the relationship between other related attitudes to patriotism and nationalism. Specifically, we examined smugness, attitudes toward global welfare, civil liberties, world government beliefs, military approval, and desire for punishment. The usable sample provided empirical evidence for researching attitudes that may contribute to higher patriotism or nationalism. A series of correlations indicated relationships between the variables. Additionally, a multiple regression indicated patriotism is significantly predicted by negative attitudes toward civil liberties and a world government, increased smugness, and increased conservativism, F(6, 67) = 23.04, p < .001, R2= .67. However, nationalism was only predicted by increased smugness, F (6, 67) = 12.16, p < .001, R2 = .52). The results indicate that a combination of these variables and attitudes can successfully predict patriotism. In addition, the smugness variable was the only predictor of nationalism. Significant findings add to the current research and may help future researchers develop a way to enhance patriotism without the derogatory attitudes of nationalism.

Location

Small Ballroom, Curris Center

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:30 AM

Attitudes Predicting Patriotism and Nationalism

Small Ballroom, Curris Center

Two important parts to national identification are patriotism (positively identifying with one’s own country) and nationalism (i.e., contempt for countries other than one’s own; Citrin, Wong, & Duff, 2001; Williams, Foster, & Krohn, 2008). Although these two constructs are closely interrelated, they are separate. Of particular interest is whether one can predict increased nationalism or patriotism, with personality variables, (i.e., core conservatism and smugness) as well as other related attitudes, such as attitudes toward internationalism, civil liberties, a world government, and desire for punishment. The current study examined the relationship between other related attitudes to patriotism and nationalism. Specifically, we examined smugness, attitudes toward global welfare, civil liberties, world government beliefs, military approval, and desire for punishment. The usable sample provided empirical evidence for researching attitudes that may contribute to higher patriotism or nationalism. A series of correlations indicated relationships between the variables. Additionally, a multiple regression indicated patriotism is significantly predicted by negative attitudes toward civil liberties and a world government, increased smugness, and increased conservativism, F(6, 67) = 23.04, p < .001, R2= .67. However, nationalism was only predicted by increased smugness, F (6, 67) = 12.16, p < .001, R2 = .52). The results indicate that a combination of these variables and attitudes can successfully predict patriotism. In addition, the smugness variable was the only predictor of nationalism. Significant findings add to the current research and may help future researchers develop a way to enhance patriotism without the derogatory attitudes of nationalism.