Title

The Nail That Sticks Up: An Analysis of Japanese Identity

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Fusae Ekida

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

出る釘:日本の同一性の解析

The Nail That Sticks Up: An Analysis of Japanese Identity

This presentation examines the conflict between the two Identities that each Japanese person possesses. These are the true identity, and the identity projected by a Japanese person in order to conform to society’s expectations. This examination is conducted in the context of the novel The Broken Commandment by Shimazaki Tōeson. This project will analyze the main character, and other character’s interactions with each other, their inner monologue, and the policies created by society. These examples will show the conflicts and resolutions in balancing the two identities, as well as connect this conflict/resolution to the larger narrative of Japanese identity dissonance, which continues even in modern Japanese society.

Cassandra Nutt, Japanese and English (class of 2016)

Research Advisor: Fusae Ekida

Location

Barkley Room, Curris Center

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

Affiliations

Modern Languages Senior Colloquium

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Apr 19th, 3:30 PM Apr 19th, 5:30 AM

The Nail That Sticks Up: An Analysis of Japanese Identity

Barkley Room, Curris Center

出る釘:日本の同一性の解析

The Nail That Sticks Up: An Analysis of Japanese Identity

This presentation examines the conflict between the two Identities that each Japanese person possesses. These are the true identity, and the identity projected by a Japanese person in order to conform to society’s expectations. This examination is conducted in the context of the novel The Broken Commandment by Shimazaki Tōeson. This project will analyze the main character, and other character’s interactions with each other, their inner monologue, and the policies created by society. These examples will show the conflicts and resolutions in balancing the two identities, as well as connect this conflict/resolution to the larger narrative of Japanese identity dissonance, which continues even in modern Japanese society.

Cassandra Nutt, Japanese and English (class of 2016)

Research Advisor: Fusae Ekida