Title

Reducing rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infections

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Marcia Hobbs

Second Project Mentor & Advisor(s)

Dina Byers

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to research different methods for decreasing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients.

Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are very common in the hospital setting. These infections are very costly to the hospital and compromise patient safety by increasing rates of morbidity and mortality. In order for CAUTI rates to decrease, nurses and physicians must become more aware of the presence of catheters in patients.

Method: A search was conducted using CINAHL, Medline, and Google Scholar for current research studies regarding the reduction of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

Results: The implementation of reminder systems, both physical and virtual, significantly reduced the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients.

Conclusions: Rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infections can be decreased by executing paper and computer-based reminder systems to help alert nurses and physicians of the presence of catheters in their patients.

Location

Small Ballroom, Curris Center

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

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Apr 18th, 12:00 PM Apr 18th, 2:00 PM

Reducing rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Small Ballroom, Curris Center

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to research different methods for decreasing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients.

Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are very common in the hospital setting. These infections are very costly to the hospital and compromise patient safety by increasing rates of morbidity and mortality. In order for CAUTI rates to decrease, nurses and physicians must become more aware of the presence of catheters in patients.

Method: A search was conducted using CINAHL, Medline, and Google Scholar for current research studies regarding the reduction of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

Results: The implementation of reminder systems, both physical and virtual, significantly reduced the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients.

Conclusions: Rates of catheter-associated urinary tract infections can be decreased by executing paper and computer-based reminder systems to help alert nurses and physicians of the presence of catheters in their patients.