Title

Characteristics of roost tree use by the tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) post- white-nose syndrome in the Four Rivers watershed

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Terry L. Derting

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

The tri-colored bat is undergoing severe declines across its range due to white nose syndrome, a fungal disease causing massive bat mortality in eastern North America. Our objective was to determine distinguishing characteristics of roost trees used by tri-colored bats so their roost needs can be considered in management plans. We mist-netted for tri-colored bats at Land Between the Lakes and Clarks River in western Kentucky. We attached a radio transmitter to adult bats. We tracked six bats to their day roosts for 1-12 days. Habitat data were collected at 19 roost trees and at randomly selected trees in the area for comparison. Our initial data showed that tri-colored bats use roost trees within a relatively small area. The greatest distance moved between successive roosts was 207.8 m, with an average distance between roosts of 68.9 m. Bats remained within 2.5 km of their original capture site. All roosting bats were located in the foliage of live trees. Tri-colored bats may not select roost trees at random. Bats were observed roosting in 10 different species of tree, with the most commonly selected species being Carya tomentosa (Lam.) Nutt. and Liquidambar styraciflua L. (37% and 16% of roost trees, respectively). In contrast with the roost trees selected, the most abundant species among the randomly selected trees were Quercus alba L. and Acer saccharum Marshall. Management needs of tri-colored bats likely differ from those of other declining bat species which have preference for trees in mid-decay stages.

Location

Barkley Room, Curris Center

Start Date

20-4-2016 9:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2016 4:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 4:00 PM

Characteristics of roost tree use by the tri-colored bat (Perimyotis subflavus) post- white-nose syndrome in the Four Rivers watershed

Barkley Room, Curris Center

The tri-colored bat is undergoing severe declines across its range due to white nose syndrome, a fungal disease causing massive bat mortality in eastern North America. Our objective was to determine distinguishing characteristics of roost trees used by tri-colored bats so their roost needs can be considered in management plans. We mist-netted for tri-colored bats at Land Between the Lakes and Clarks River in western Kentucky. We attached a radio transmitter to adult bats. We tracked six bats to their day roosts for 1-12 days. Habitat data were collected at 19 roost trees and at randomly selected trees in the area for comparison. Our initial data showed that tri-colored bats use roost trees within a relatively small area. The greatest distance moved between successive roosts was 207.8 m, with an average distance between roosts of 68.9 m. Bats remained within 2.5 km of their original capture site. All roosting bats were located in the foliage of live trees. Tri-colored bats may not select roost trees at random. Bats were observed roosting in 10 different species of tree, with the most commonly selected species being Carya tomentosa (Lam.) Nutt. and Liquidambar styraciflua L. (37% and 16% of roost trees, respectively). In contrast with the roost trees selected, the most abundant species among the randomly selected trees were Quercus alba L. and Acer saccharum Marshall. Management needs of tri-colored bats likely differ from those of other declining bat species which have preference for trees in mid-decay stages.