Title

Sports Fandom and Relationships: Perceptions of a significant other’s favorite sport team

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Jana Hackathorn

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

Past studies have shown that similarities between couples relate to higher levels of attraction (Bryne, Clore, & Smeaton, 1986). Other studies have shown that couples who watch sports together have higher relationship satisfaction than couples that don't (Roloff and Solomon, 1989). Due to these past findings, the researchers formed a hypothesis: People who perceive their partners as having the same favorite team will view them differently than those who perceive their partners having a different favorite team on different relationship satisfaction qualities. A convenient sample of 108 undergraduate students from a Midwestern university were surveyed regarding their fandom level, their favorite team, their significant other's perceived favorite team, and measures regarding their relationship. We found that, overall, participants who perceived their partners as having the same favorite team viewed their partners as more intelligent and more attractive. However, differences in general relationship satisfaction was not significant.

Location

Ohio Room, Curris Center

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

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Apr 21st, 12:00 PM Apr 21st, 1:15 PM

Sports Fandom and Relationships: Perceptions of a significant other’s favorite sport team

Ohio Room, Curris Center

Past studies have shown that similarities between couples relate to higher levels of attraction (Bryne, Clore, & Smeaton, 1986). Other studies have shown that couples who watch sports together have higher relationship satisfaction than couples that don't (Roloff and Solomon, 1989). Due to these past findings, the researchers formed a hypothesis: People who perceive their partners as having the same favorite team will view them differently than those who perceive their partners having a different favorite team on different relationship satisfaction qualities. A convenient sample of 108 undergraduate students from a Midwestern university were surveyed regarding their fandom level, their favorite team, their significant other's perceived favorite team, and measures regarding their relationship. We found that, overall, participants who perceived their partners as having the same favorite team viewed their partners as more intelligent and more attractive. However, differences in general relationship satisfaction was not significant.