Title

Dressed to Impress (or Is She?): Judgments of Attraction Based on Attire

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Jana Hackathorn

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

This study examined first impressions, perceptions, and social attributions individuals make based on another’s attire. The difference in viewers’ perceptions in regard to two photos of women (i.e., one that was casually dressed or one that was dressed scantily) was measured. The study examined the differences in judgments of the woman’s personality, and included assessments of six different traits: interpersonal skills, intellect, physical attractiveness, social status, interpersonal power, and family orientation. Results indicated that individuals perceive the casually dressed female to have better interpersonal skills as well as higher intelligence and better social status than the provocatively dressed female. Moreover, the casually dressed female was perceived as more family oriented than the provocatively dressed woman. Importantly there was no difference in perceived physical attractiveness. As this could have evolutionary consequences, these findings might suggest that provocative attire may not be necessary for mate attraction. Implications will be discussed.

Location

Large Ballroom, Curris Center

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

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Apr 18th, 12:00 PM Apr 18th, 2:00 PM

Dressed to Impress (or Is She?): Judgments of Attraction Based on Attire

Large Ballroom, Curris Center

This study examined first impressions, perceptions, and social attributions individuals make based on another’s attire. The difference in viewers’ perceptions in regard to two photos of women (i.e., one that was casually dressed or one that was dressed scantily) was measured. The study examined the differences in judgments of the woman’s personality, and included assessments of six different traits: interpersonal skills, intellect, physical attractiveness, social status, interpersonal power, and family orientation. Results indicated that individuals perceive the casually dressed female to have better interpersonal skills as well as higher intelligence and better social status than the provocatively dressed female. Moreover, the casually dressed female was perceived as more family oriented than the provocatively dressed woman. Importantly there was no difference in perceived physical attractiveness. As this could have evolutionary consequences, these findings might suggest that provocative attire may not be necessary for mate attraction. Implications will be discussed.