Title

Predictors of Convenient Sample Behaviors

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Jana Hackthorn

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

This study is examining convenient sample behaviors that threaten internal validity. As psychology relies on self-report measures, researchers should take extra steps to ensure the data is good. Importantly, this begins with the participants. The current study examined what variables might predict bad convenience sample behaviors (operationalized as missing embedded attention items) such as time taken, academic entitlement, academic dishonesty, procrastination, and participant ethics training scores. Participants (N = 61) were recruited to complete an online survey. The survey contained six embedded attention items (e.g., If you are reading this question, mark two). Due to the low sample size, participants were dichotomized as having missed an attention item or not. Preliminary results indicate that individuals who fail the attention items are higher in academic entitlement and perform lower on the participant ethics training exam than individuals who do not fail the attention items. Data is still currently being collected.

Location

Large Ballroom, Curris Center

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 12:00 PM Apr 18th, 2:00 PM

Predictors of Convenient Sample Behaviors

Large Ballroom, Curris Center

This study is examining convenient sample behaviors that threaten internal validity. As psychology relies on self-report measures, researchers should take extra steps to ensure the data is good. Importantly, this begins with the participants. The current study examined what variables might predict bad convenience sample behaviors (operationalized as missing embedded attention items) such as time taken, academic entitlement, academic dishonesty, procrastination, and participant ethics training scores. Participants (N = 61) were recruited to complete an online survey. The survey contained six embedded attention items (e.g., If you are reading this question, mark two). Due to the low sample size, participants were dichotomized as having missed an attention item or not. Preliminary results indicate that individuals who fail the attention items are higher in academic entitlement and perform lower on the participant ethics training exam than individuals who do not fail the attention items. Data is still currently being collected.