Title

Examining the effects of riparian disturbance on litter decomposition in a degraded stream

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Howard Whiteman

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract/Description

In forested streams, organic matter imported from riparian vegetation is a primary source of energy, especially for macroinvertebrate shredders. In western Colorado, Kimball Creek is a degraded stream in which loss of riparian vegetation may have decreased litter inputs, altering shredder abundance and therefore litter decomposition rates. In two open canopy and two shaded stream reaches, leaf pack experiments using box-elder (Acer negundo) and gamble oak (Quercus gambelii) were conducted to determine litter decomposition rates. In addition, macroinvertebrates collected from leaf packs were used to investigate potential differences in shredder abundance and diversity between the four study reaches. Research is ongoing and may provide insight into understanding the effects of human-induced degradation on stream ecosystem function.

Location

Barkley Room, Curris Center

Start Date

April 2016

End Date

April 2016

This document is currently not available here.

Share

Import Event to Google Calendar

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 9:00 AM Apr 20th, 4:00 PM

Examining the effects of riparian disturbance on litter decomposition in a degraded stream

Barkley Room, Curris Center

In forested streams, organic matter imported from riparian vegetation is a primary source of energy, especially for macroinvertebrate shredders. In western Colorado, Kimball Creek is a degraded stream in which loss of riparian vegetation may have decreased litter inputs, altering shredder abundance and therefore litter decomposition rates. In two open canopy and two shaded stream reaches, leaf pack experiments using box-elder (Acer negundo) and gamble oak (Quercus gambelii) were conducted to determine litter decomposition rates. In addition, macroinvertebrates collected from leaf packs were used to investigate potential differences in shredder abundance and diversity between the four study reaches. Research is ongoing and may provide insight into understanding the effects of human-induced degradation on stream ecosystem function.