Evidence Based Best Practices in Clinical Healthcare

Title

Phasing Out Physical Restraints

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

Minor

N/A

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Marcia Hobbs

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Process Description

Physical Restraints, are they necessary to provide quality care in Critical Care units? This topic is very controversial not only in the United States but throughout the world. The Center of Medicare and Medicaid defines physical restraints as “any manual method or physical or mechanical device, material, or equipment attached or adjacent to the resident’s body that the individual cannot remove easily which restricts freedom of movement or normal access to one’s body.” (CMS, 2007) As this definition says; anything restricting the movement of a patient can be deemed a restraint. Whether it is strictly designed to be a physical restraint or not. One of the most forgotten types of physical restraint is placing all side rails in the upright position on a patient’s bed. This does not allow a patient to freely move where he or she would like. Patients in critical care setting can be deemed needing restraints for many reasons including agitation and being physically aggressive. “More than 80% of patients in ICU’s may experience some degree of agitation and delirium during the term of hospitalization”. (Moradimajd, Noughabi, Meran, and Zolfaghari, 2016) Physical restraints in critical care units have a higher prevalence in order to protect patients from extubating themselves and pulling out invasive lines. Physical restraints are used 24%-40% more often in critical care setting than in other general units. (Moradimajd, Noughabi, Meran, and Zolfaghari, 2016)

Location

Large Ballroom, Curris Center, Murray State University

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Affiliations

Nursing

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Nov 14th, 11:30 AM Nov 14th, 1:30 PM

Phasing Out Physical Restraints

Large Ballroom, Curris Center, Murray State University

Process Description

Physical Restraints, are they necessary to provide quality care in Critical Care units? This topic is very controversial not only in the United States but throughout the world. The Center of Medicare and Medicaid defines physical restraints as “any manual method or physical or mechanical device, material, or equipment attached or adjacent to the resident’s body that the individual cannot remove easily which restricts freedom of movement or normal access to one’s body.” (CMS, 2007) As this definition says; anything restricting the movement of a patient can be deemed a restraint. Whether it is strictly designed to be a physical restraint or not. One of the most forgotten types of physical restraint is placing all side rails in the upright position on a patient’s bed. This does not allow a patient to freely move where he or she would like. Patients in critical care setting can be deemed needing restraints for many reasons including agitation and being physically aggressive. “More than 80% of patients in ICU’s may experience some degree of agitation and delirium during the term of hospitalization”. (Moradimajd, Noughabi, Meran, and Zolfaghari, 2016) Physical restraints in critical care units have a higher prevalence in order to protect patients from extubating themselves and pulling out invasive lines. Physical restraints are used 24%-40% more often in critical care setting than in other general units. (Moradimajd, Noughabi, Meran, and Zolfaghari, 2016)