Our Global Environment: Past, Present and Future - Geosciences Seminar

Presenter Information

Hongli YangFollow
Robin Q. ZhangFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Geosciences

Minor

Remote Sensing

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Robin Q. Zhang

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Up-to-date and detailed vegetation map provides critical information for habitat management. In addition, a vegetation map is necessary for the Park’s Fire Management, for classification of fuel types, and for delineation of fire management units. There have been several attempts of vegetation mapping in 1934, 1975 and 1997. Recent advancements in mapping technology and the availability of high resolution Lidar data call for a new vegetation map for the Park’s management team.

In this study, Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) imagery, Lidar and geology dataset were applied to vegetation mapping. Habitat types are determined by a combination of geology, aspect and slope. Coniferous and deciduous trees are distinguished using multi-date Landsat-8 imagery through image classification and NDVI analysis. Habitat type and physical properties derived from Lidar data will be applied to identify specific vegetation species.

The research will produce a new vegetation map and a habitat map for the Mammoth Cave National Park. The maps will provide critical information for habitat and fire management. The research method integrating Lidar and Landsat-8 data in digital vegetation and habitat mapping will be valuable for similar projects at other locations.

Location

Classroom 211 & Front-South Lobby, Waterfield Library

Start Date

18-11-2016 12:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2016 12:00 AM

Affiliations

Geosciences

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Nov 18th, 12:00 AM Apr 18th, 12:00 AM

Vegetation Mapping of Mammoth Cave National Park using Multi-date Landsat-8 Imagery and Lidar data

Classroom 211 & Front-South Lobby, Waterfield Library

Up-to-date and detailed vegetation map provides critical information for habitat management. In addition, a vegetation map is necessary for the Park’s Fire Management, for classification of fuel types, and for delineation of fire management units. There have been several attempts of vegetation mapping in 1934, 1975 and 1997. Recent advancements in mapping technology and the availability of high resolution Lidar data call for a new vegetation map for the Park’s management team.

In this study, Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) imagery, Lidar and geology dataset were applied to vegetation mapping. Habitat types are determined by a combination of geology, aspect and slope. Coniferous and deciduous trees are distinguished using multi-date Landsat-8 imagery through image classification and NDVI analysis. Habitat type and physical properties derived from Lidar data will be applied to identify specific vegetation species.

The research will produce a new vegetation map and a habitat map for the Mammoth Cave National Park. The maps will provide critical information for habitat and fire management. The research method integrating Lidar and Landsat-8 data in digital vegetation and habitat mapping will be valuable for similar projects at other locations.