Honors: All College Participants

Title

Parental Influences that Positively Correlate with Better Dietary Habits in Children with Autism

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Social Welfare

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Maria Brown

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Generally, compared to their peers without autism, children with autism struggle to maintain a healthy diet. Some issues that can contribute to their abnormal diet include an aversion to certain food textures, a strict insistence to eat certain foods at certain times of the day, and not eating certain foods until they complete a ritual only meaningful to them. This study will examine certain events that are potentially related to helping the child with autism achieve a healthier diet. Is the child more likely to consume healthier meals if their parent(s) talk them into having the meal? What if the parent(s) gently coaxed the child to consume their meal? What if physical prompts encouraging the child to eat their meal were positively correlated to the child eating more of their food? And if the parent(s) outright feed their child the meal, would it positively correlate with healthier habits? The primary goal of this research is to help clinicians and psychologists better understand how children with autism can achieve a healthier diet. Anonymous patient information from the National Database for Autism Research will be used to examine which parental behaviors can relate to dietary habits in children with autism.

Location

Classroom 211, Waterfield Library

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Affiliations

Honors Thesis, Psychology: Completed Projects

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Nov 16th, 1:30 PM Nov 16th, 4:00 PM

Parental Influences that Positively Correlate with Better Dietary Habits in Children with Autism

Classroom 211, Waterfield Library

Generally, compared to their peers without autism, children with autism struggle to maintain a healthy diet. Some issues that can contribute to their abnormal diet include an aversion to certain food textures, a strict insistence to eat certain foods at certain times of the day, and not eating certain foods until they complete a ritual only meaningful to them. This study will examine certain events that are potentially related to helping the child with autism achieve a healthier diet. Is the child more likely to consume healthier meals if their parent(s) talk them into having the meal? What if the parent(s) gently coaxed the child to consume their meal? What if physical prompts encouraging the child to eat their meal were positively correlated to the child eating more of their food? And if the parent(s) outright feed their child the meal, would it positively correlate with healthier habits? The primary goal of this research is to help clinicians and psychologists better understand how children with autism can achieve a healthier diet. Anonymous patient information from the National Database for Autism Research will be used to examine which parental behaviors can relate to dietary habits in children with autism.