Honors: All College Participants

Title

Setting Precedents for a Nation on Trial Selection of Defendants for the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

International Studies

Minor

Chinese

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. David Pizzo

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg, commonly known as the Nuremberg Trials, is credited with indictment of the major Nazi war criminals of the Second World War. But, were all of the individuals who were indicted in 1945 actually major war criminals? Or, were they minor war criminals who happened to be more well-known? Through the use of historical and legal means, my research looks to why the twenty-four defendants were chosen to be indicted in an era which hosts scores of persons who could be labelled major war criminals. Reasons including the groups that these defendants were connected with and the government positions they held both formally and informally within the Third Reich. These defendants were chosen in order to be used as a first impression which would be used as legal precedent against the rest of post-Nazi Germany in the criminal cases that followed the fall of the Third Reich by both international and national powers.

Location

Classroom 211, Waterfield Library

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Affiliations

Honors Thesis

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 16th, 9:00 AM Nov 6th, 12:30 PM

Setting Precedents for a Nation on Trial Selection of Defendants for the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg

Classroom 211, Waterfield Library

The International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg, commonly known as the Nuremberg Trials, is credited with indictment of the major Nazi war criminals of the Second World War. But, were all of the individuals who were indicted in 1945 actually major war criminals? Or, were they minor war criminals who happened to be more well-known? Through the use of historical and legal means, my research looks to why the twenty-four defendants were chosen to be indicted in an era which hosts scores of persons who could be labelled major war criminals. Reasons including the groups that these defendants were connected with and the government positions they held both formally and informally within the Third Reich. These defendants were chosen in order to be used as a first impression which would be used as legal precedent against the rest of post-Nazi Germany in the criminal cases that followed the fall of the Third Reich by both international and national powers.