Honors: All College Participants

Title

Flower Meanings: Are They Relevant Today?

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Agr Science/Horticulture

Minor

NA

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Kimberly Bellah, PhD; Warren Edminster PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

This qualitative study sought to describe contemporary views of ten selected flower specimens regarding the feelings they evoke in eighteen participants divided evenly across three generations: Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials. Little research exists in the scholarly body of knowledge regarding definitions of flowers; however, industry publications have captured some traditionally held definitions of some flowers. This phenomenological study utilized participants in the three generations of interest by showing each participant photos of ten selected cut flower specimens and asking them five questions about the emotions evoked by each flower, how they would feel if they received each flower, perceived symbolism and representation of each flower, and their own assigned meaning for each flower. After reduction and structural syntheses were conducted, definitions for eight flowers were derived. Two flowers had inconsistent definitions; however, literature shows some inconsistency throughout history as well. Recommendations for future studies include larger sample sizes to better understand the generations, larger areas or locations of sampling to show a wider sample, and an improved interview protocol to evoke more in-depth responses from all participants. Practitioner recommendations include using definitions that are more current and understanding of consumer perceptions in making floral sales recommendations.

Location

Classroom 211, Waterfield Library

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Affiliations

Honors Thesis

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Nov 15th, 9:30 AM Nov 15th, 12:30 PM

Flower Meanings: Are They Relevant Today?

Classroom 211, Waterfield Library

This qualitative study sought to describe contemporary views of ten selected flower specimens regarding the feelings they evoke in eighteen participants divided evenly across three generations: Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials. Little research exists in the scholarly body of knowledge regarding definitions of flowers; however, industry publications have captured some traditionally held definitions of some flowers. This phenomenological study utilized participants in the three generations of interest by showing each participant photos of ten selected cut flower specimens and asking them five questions about the emotions evoked by each flower, how they would feel if they received each flower, perceived symbolism and representation of each flower, and their own assigned meaning for each flower. After reduction and structural syntheses were conducted, definitions for eight flowers were derived. Two flowers had inconsistent definitions; however, literature shows some inconsistency throughout history as well. Recommendations for future studies include larger sample sizes to better understand the generations, larger areas or locations of sampling to show a wider sample, and an improved interview protocol to evoke more in-depth responses from all participants. Practitioner recommendations include using definitions that are more current and understanding of consumer perceptions in making floral sales recommendations.