Title

Roy Lichtenstein's Contributions to the Birth of American Pop Art: The New York World's Fair of 1964, Comics, Cartoon Art, and Beyond

Presenter Information

David KupinskiFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Liberal Arts

Minor

Art

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Staci Stone; Dr. Antje Gamble; Mr. James Nance

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Literature associated with the 1964 New York World’s Fair known as, the pinnacle of Pop Art in the United States, the career of Roy Lichtenstein from 1960 to 1964 and his impact on comic and cartoon art were examined. This investigation yielded three themes: reception of American Pop Art prior to and during the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Lichtenstein’s version of Pop Art, and American perceptions of art as a result of Lichtenstein’s contributions. Lichtenstein’ works Look Mickey, WHAAM!, Drowning Girl, and Girl in Window, were examined to frame the researchers’ interpretations about how these works paved the way for comic and cartoon art to evolve into marketable art forms. Reviews by art critics offered scholarly insight into these developments, both for and against. A research paper and poster of sample works representing the inclusion of comic and cartoon art from branding and advertising campaigns during the late twentieth century will present further support for the link between Lichtenstein’s works and twenty-first century comics and cartoon-art.

Keywords: Roy Lichtenstein, World’s Fair, New York, Pop Art, Comics,

Affiliations

General Posters Session--ONLY, Liberal Arts

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Roy Lichtenstein's Contributions to the Birth of American Pop Art: The New York World's Fair of 1964, Comics, Cartoon Art, and Beyond

Literature associated with the 1964 New York World’s Fair known as, the pinnacle of Pop Art in the United States, the career of Roy Lichtenstein from 1960 to 1964 and his impact on comic and cartoon art were examined. This investigation yielded three themes: reception of American Pop Art prior to and during the 1964 New York World’s Fair, Lichtenstein’s version of Pop Art, and American perceptions of art as a result of Lichtenstein’s contributions. Lichtenstein’ works Look Mickey, WHAAM!, Drowning Girl, and Girl in Window, were examined to frame the researchers’ interpretations about how these works paved the way for comic and cartoon art to evolve into marketable art forms. Reviews by art critics offered scholarly insight into these developments, both for and against. A research paper and poster of sample works representing the inclusion of comic and cartoon art from branding and advertising campaigns during the late twentieth century will present further support for the link between Lichtenstein’s works and twenty-first century comics and cartoon-art.

Keywords: Roy Lichtenstein, World’s Fair, New York, Pop Art, Comics,