Title

How Ten Days in a Madhouse Changed Journalism and Mental Health History

Presenter Information

Sydney ChambersFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

<-- Select One -->

Major

Mass Communications

Minor

na

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Melony Shemberger

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Nellie Bly’s famous exposé, Ten Days in a Madhouse, was published in 1887 in Pulitzer’s New York World. Nellie Bly, a relatively unexperienced journalist, was tasked with investigating the Blackwell Island asylum. Bly took her assignment seriously and went on to fake insanity to gain admittance to the asylum. While at Bellevue and Blackwell Island, Bly documented the abuse and mistreatment patients dealt with. Bly’s exposé shed light regarding how mentally ill patients were seen in the 19th century — as poor, dangerous, and non-feminine women. Further, Bly’s exposé led to changes within her personal life, journalism, and the mental health system as a whole.

Affiliations

OTHER Affiliation

Other Affiliations

JMC 615

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

How Ten Days in a Madhouse Changed Journalism and Mental Health History

Nellie Bly’s famous exposé, Ten Days in a Madhouse, was published in 1887 in Pulitzer’s New York World. Nellie Bly, a relatively unexperienced journalist, was tasked with investigating the Blackwell Island asylum. Bly took her assignment seriously and went on to fake insanity to gain admittance to the asylum. While at Bellevue and Blackwell Island, Bly documented the abuse and mistreatment patients dealt with. Bly’s exposé shed light regarding how mentally ill patients were seen in the 19th century — as poor, dangerous, and non-feminine women. Further, Bly’s exposé led to changes within her personal life, journalism, and the mental health system as a whole.