Title

The More You Know: The Effects of Psychoeducation on Stigma

Presenter Information

Casey BrughFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Sociology (2nd Major)

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Joyce

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Many people view individuals with mental illness in discriminatory ways, potentially causing issues in treatment (Masuda, Price, Anderson, Schmertz, and Alamaras, 2009; US Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). This study examines the relationship between stigma and psychoeducation regarding pica. Participants received a survey with one of three vignettes describing an individual with pica. In one condition, only pica symptoms were described, in another a pica diagnosis was given, and in the third pica treatment was described. There were 100 undergraduate student participants enrolled in an Introductory Psychology class. An ANOVA was performed to determine differences between the three groups. Result indicate that there was a significant difference in the level of stigma between the three groups in all three measures of stigma including overall stigma [F(2,99)= 13.130, p=.000], personal stigma [F(2,99)=7.565, p=.001], and perceived stigma [F(2,99)=9.018, p=.000]. This means that psychoeducation and teaching people about a mental illness is successful in reducing levels of stigma towards an individuals with mental illness. This is important because it could impact the way in which we raise awareness of and teach others about mental illness, leading to better lives for those affected.

Affiliations

Psychology: Completed Projects

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The More You Know: The Effects of Psychoeducation on Stigma

Many people view individuals with mental illness in discriminatory ways, potentially causing issues in treatment (Masuda, Price, Anderson, Schmertz, and Alamaras, 2009; US Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). This study examines the relationship between stigma and psychoeducation regarding pica. Participants received a survey with one of three vignettes describing an individual with pica. In one condition, only pica symptoms were described, in another a pica diagnosis was given, and in the third pica treatment was described. There were 100 undergraduate student participants enrolled in an Introductory Psychology class. An ANOVA was performed to determine differences between the three groups. Result indicate that there was a significant difference in the level of stigma between the three groups in all three measures of stigma including overall stigma [F(2,99)= 13.130, p=.000], personal stigma [F(2,99)=7.565, p=.001], and perceived stigma [F(2,99)=9.018, p=.000]. This means that psychoeducation and teaching people about a mental illness is successful in reducing levels of stigma towards an individuals with mental illness. This is important because it could impact the way in which we raise awareness of and teach others about mental illness, leading to better lives for those affected.