Title

Pot Calling the Kettle Black: The (NON)Effects of Romantic Deception

Presenter Information

Sarah RaoFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Business Administration

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Jana Hackathorn

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

A recent study found that being lied to in a previous romantic relationship predicts a higher likelihood of lying in one’s current romantic relationship. Counter to the hypotheses, being lied to creates a cycle of lying regardless if there was emotional pain involved upon discovery of the deception. This current study investigated why that relationship exists. Some major factors considered were the general acceptability of lies, forgiveness, and relationship satisfaction. Unexpectedly, the acceptability of lies in past relationships is not related to the likelihood of lying in current relationships. Thus, the acceptability of the deceptive behaviors that a previous partner engaged in was not predictive of the likelihood of the participant engaging in the same deceptive behaviors to their current partners. Individuals do not find deceptive behaviors acceptable when they are done to them; however, it is acceptable to take part in the same deceptive behaviors themselves.

Affiliations

Psychology: Projects in Progress

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Pot Calling the Kettle Black: The (NON)Effects of Romantic Deception

A recent study found that being lied to in a previous romantic relationship predicts a higher likelihood of lying in one’s current romantic relationship. Counter to the hypotheses, being lied to creates a cycle of lying regardless if there was emotional pain involved upon discovery of the deception. This current study investigated why that relationship exists. Some major factors considered were the general acceptability of lies, forgiveness, and relationship satisfaction. Unexpectedly, the acceptability of lies in past relationships is not related to the likelihood of lying in current relationships. Thus, the acceptability of the deceptive behaviors that a previous partner engaged in was not predictive of the likelihood of the participant engaging in the same deceptive behaviors to their current partners. Individuals do not find deceptive behaviors acceptable when they are done to them; however, it is acceptable to take part in the same deceptive behaviors themselves.