Title

Two Homelands: An Analysis on Japanese American Identity

Presenter Information

Alexander ScottFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Japanese

Minor

International Studies

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Fusae Ekida

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Two Homelands: An Analysis of Japanese American Identity

During World War II, the entire world was engulfed in six long years of external conflict. But for some, there was a considerable degree of internal conflict. Yamasaki Toyoko wrote a story of Japanese American brothers, Kenji, Tadashi and Osamu, who battle with themselves and their surroundings to capture a clear sense of identity. The brothers develop different ideas of self-identification, which clash with external opinions and beliefs. Yamasaki’s novel, Two Homelands, is an epic story of three brothers being torn between Japan and the United States. The three brothers separately define their identities while being caught between two cultures, two languages, and opposing factions both on and off of the battlefield. This presentation will illustrate the struggle that these three characters face in order to find their identities. Struggles include discrimination from both the American and Japanese sides of the war and forced internment as well as many others. Using examples from the text, I argue that national identity is formed through education, positive and negative experiences, and each character’s environment.

Affiliations

Modern Languages Senior Colloquium

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Two Homelands: An Analysis on Japanese American Identity

Two Homelands: An Analysis of Japanese American Identity

During World War II, the entire world was engulfed in six long years of external conflict. But for some, there was a considerable degree of internal conflict. Yamasaki Toyoko wrote a story of Japanese American brothers, Kenji, Tadashi and Osamu, who battle with themselves and their surroundings to capture a clear sense of identity. The brothers develop different ideas of self-identification, which clash with external opinions and beliefs. Yamasaki’s novel, Two Homelands, is an epic story of three brothers being torn between Japan and the United States. The three brothers separately define their identities while being caught between two cultures, two languages, and opposing factions both on and off of the battlefield. This presentation will illustrate the struggle that these three characters face in order to find their identities. Struggles include discrimination from both the American and Japanese sides of the war and forced internment as well as many others. Using examples from the text, I argue that national identity is formed through education, positive and negative experiences, and each character’s environment.