SNHP | Senior Nursing Poster Session

Presenter Information

Stacie L. HearellFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

Minor

n/a

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Jessica Naber

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Throughout clinical experiences in western Kentucky intensive care units, it has been observed that critically ill patients are not receiving fully implemented skin care practice according to hospital and company policy. Patients are not turned completely to one side or the other due to size, mechanical intubation, and other medical devices that may be intimidating to staff. Alderen et al., (2011) states that “in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients, pressure ulcer risk is high and may result in negative patient outcomes and increased healthcare costs.” Gallant, Morin, St-Germain, and Dallaire (2010) state that “In practice, pressure ulcers are indicators of quality of care.” Hospital associated pressure ulcers have also been considered by the federal government and are now “included in 2 pay-for-performance programs under the Patient Protection and Afforable Care Act that have great implicatiosn for hospital finances: penalties for hospital-acquired conditions and value-based purchasing incentives” (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2016). For this study, a critical appraisal of several evidence based practice studies was completed and findings were compared to a local medical intensive care unit’s skin integrity policy. I contacted the director of intensive care services at the local hospital and arranged a time to implement the teaching plan and policy change suggestions with staff. A flyer was created to advertise the teaching, and the director administered the flyers within staffing areas of the hospital as well as gathered staff on the day of teaching. A 10-minute teaching session was performed using lecture and visual poster board explaining the findings of the study along with a question and answer session at the end. Revisions to the current skin care policy were recommended to allow implementation into the intensive care unit nursing practice. Recommendations for quarterly in-service education regarding pressure ulcer staging and wound care implementation strategies were also suggested based on research findings. All research findings and proposed policy changes were supplied to the director of critical care services as well as wound and ostomy care coordinator for revision.

Affiliations

Nursing

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Improving Tissue Integrity in Intensive Care Unit Patients

Throughout clinical experiences in western Kentucky intensive care units, it has been observed that critically ill patients are not receiving fully implemented skin care practice according to hospital and company policy. Patients are not turned completely to one side or the other due to size, mechanical intubation, and other medical devices that may be intimidating to staff. Alderen et al., (2011) states that “in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients, pressure ulcer risk is high and may result in negative patient outcomes and increased healthcare costs.” Gallant, Morin, St-Germain, and Dallaire (2010) state that “In practice, pressure ulcers are indicators of quality of care.” Hospital associated pressure ulcers have also been considered by the federal government and are now “included in 2 pay-for-performance programs under the Patient Protection and Afforable Care Act that have great implicatiosn for hospital finances: penalties for hospital-acquired conditions and value-based purchasing incentives” (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2016). For this study, a critical appraisal of several evidence based practice studies was completed and findings were compared to a local medical intensive care unit’s skin integrity policy. I contacted the director of intensive care services at the local hospital and arranged a time to implement the teaching plan and policy change suggestions with staff. A flyer was created to advertise the teaching, and the director administered the flyers within staffing areas of the hospital as well as gathered staff on the day of teaching. A 10-minute teaching session was performed using lecture and visual poster board explaining the findings of the study along with a question and answer session at the end. Revisions to the current skin care policy were recommended to allow implementation into the intensive care unit nursing practice. Recommendations for quarterly in-service education regarding pressure ulcer staging and wound care implementation strategies were also suggested based on research findings. All research findings and proposed policy changes were supplied to the director of critical care services as well as wound and ostomy care coordinator for revision.

 

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