SNHP | Senior Nursing Poster Session

Title

Assessing the need for urinary catheters daily and reducing CAUTI rates nation-wide

Presenter Information

Taran ColemanFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Marcia Hobbs, DNS, RN

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are a growing concern in healthcare and can be reduced and possibly eliminated with constant assessment of necessity. According to the CDC, UTI’s are the fourth most common type of hospital-acquired infections. They further go on to describe that there were 93,300 UTIs reported from acute care facilities in as recent as 2011 (CDC, 2017, 1). CAUTIs, not only, cost the hospital thousands of dollars per case, but infections of the urinary tract are particularly dangerous. These infections can lead to septicemia and death. CAUTIs are now on the non-payment list for Medicare and have recently pushed to reduce and eliminate the incidence of CAUTIs nationwide (CDC).

It is clear that there is a problem with nosocomial infections, particularly hospital-acquired UTI by way of urinary catheter. The problem is two-fold. It affects the hospital clinically and corporately. From a clinical standpoint, CAUTIs are dangerous for patients and medical staff desire safety measures in place for their patient population. The corporate portion see the financial issue that follows the diagnosis of a CAUTI and the amount of money required by the hospital to pay, due to Medicare’s non-reimbursement reform of late.

This poster will describe ways to decrease and eliminate CAUTIs in the hospital setting and how to put these into practice.

Affiliations

Nursing

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Assessing the need for urinary catheters daily and reducing CAUTI rates nation-wide

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are a growing concern in healthcare and can be reduced and possibly eliminated with constant assessment of necessity. According to the CDC, UTI’s are the fourth most common type of hospital-acquired infections. They further go on to describe that there were 93,300 UTIs reported from acute care facilities in as recent as 2011 (CDC, 2017, 1). CAUTIs, not only, cost the hospital thousands of dollars per case, but infections of the urinary tract are particularly dangerous. These infections can lead to septicemia and death. CAUTIs are now on the non-payment list for Medicare and have recently pushed to reduce and eliminate the incidence of CAUTIs nationwide (CDC).

It is clear that there is a problem with nosocomial infections, particularly hospital-acquired UTI by way of urinary catheter. The problem is two-fold. It affects the hospital clinically and corporately. From a clinical standpoint, CAUTIs are dangerous for patients and medical staff desire safety measures in place for their patient population. The corporate portion see the financial issue that follows the diagnosis of a CAUTI and the amount of money required by the hospital to pay, due to Medicare’s non-reimbursement reform of late.

This poster will describe ways to decrease and eliminate CAUTIs in the hospital setting and how to put these into practice.