SNHP | Senior Nursing Poster Session

Title

Sedation Selection: Minimizing the Occurrence of Patient Complications

Presenter Information

Casey CeriFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Doctor of Nursing Practice Nurse Anesthesia

Minor

None

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Michael Perlow

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Sedative Selection Practice Change to Minimize the Occurrence of Patient Complications

Murray State University/Baptist Health

Casey Ceri, SRNA, BSN

Anesthesia providers have long struggled to find the ideal anesthetic agent combination with the greatest benefit and least detrimental side effects. In the provision of quality anesthesia patient care, influential factors in anesthetic choice include the provider’s and the patient’s perspective as well as the procedure’s anesthetic requirements. Since many institutions do not impose any protocol regarding sedation selection, the provider’s personal experience and knowledge are increasingly the influential factors in anesthetic agent selection.

Dexmedetomidine was introduced in 1999, indicated for sedation for patients in the ICU requiring mechanical ventilation but has since revealed many operating room (OR) benefits and applications to increase positive patient outcomes and decrease potential complications. To increase use of dexmedetomidine within the OR of a small Midwest US hospital, this capstone project chose to use a change model based on education in-services to increase knowledge of dexmedetomidine’s benefits and applications. Multiple round-table educational discussions were held with ten anesthesia providers regarding their thoughts and knowledge of dexmedetomidine. Resistance to change traditional practices, misperceptions regarding cost, and zero availability of the drug were major barriers to this change project. Though dexmedetomidine was not added to the hospital’s formulary until months after the capstone project timeline ended, a change in practice and new appreciation for dexmedetomidine eventually occurred. Once added, ten surveys were sent to the anesthesia providers to gauge any change in practice, in which 100% of the returned surveys (n = 4) showed satisfaction with the use of dexmedetomidine as well as agreeing that its use has improved patient care.

Key Words

Anesthetic providers: healthcare providers with education and knowledge regarding the practice of anesthesia to include certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) and Anesthesiologits

OR: operating room

Anesthetic agent: a drug used to induce anesthesia; has hypnotic effect; induces relaxation and weakens inhibitions

Dexmedetomidine: a relatively selective alpha2-adrenergic agonist drug with sedative/hypnotic, analgesia, and anxiolytic properties

Complications: negative side effects pertaining to a drug to include, respiratory depression, bradycardia, hypotension, and neurological insult

Affiliations

Nursing

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Sedation Selection: Minimizing the Occurrence of Patient Complications

Sedative Selection Practice Change to Minimize the Occurrence of Patient Complications

Murray State University/Baptist Health

Casey Ceri, SRNA, BSN

Anesthesia providers have long struggled to find the ideal anesthetic agent combination with the greatest benefit and least detrimental side effects. In the provision of quality anesthesia patient care, influential factors in anesthetic choice include the provider’s and the patient’s perspective as well as the procedure’s anesthetic requirements. Since many institutions do not impose any protocol regarding sedation selection, the provider’s personal experience and knowledge are increasingly the influential factors in anesthetic agent selection.

Dexmedetomidine was introduced in 1999, indicated for sedation for patients in the ICU requiring mechanical ventilation but has since revealed many operating room (OR) benefits and applications to increase positive patient outcomes and decrease potential complications. To increase use of dexmedetomidine within the OR of a small Midwest US hospital, this capstone project chose to use a change model based on education in-services to increase knowledge of dexmedetomidine’s benefits and applications. Multiple round-table educational discussions were held with ten anesthesia providers regarding their thoughts and knowledge of dexmedetomidine. Resistance to change traditional practices, misperceptions regarding cost, and zero availability of the drug were major barriers to this change project. Though dexmedetomidine was not added to the hospital’s formulary until months after the capstone project timeline ended, a change in practice and new appreciation for dexmedetomidine eventually occurred. Once added, ten surveys were sent to the anesthesia providers to gauge any change in practice, in which 100% of the returned surveys (n = 4) showed satisfaction with the use of dexmedetomidine as well as agreeing that its use has improved patient care.

Key Words

Anesthetic providers: healthcare providers with education and knowledge regarding the practice of anesthesia to include certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) and Anesthesiologits

OR: operating room

Anesthetic agent: a drug used to induce anesthesia; has hypnotic effect; induces relaxation and weakens inhibitions

Dexmedetomidine: a relatively selective alpha2-adrenergic agonist drug with sedative/hypnotic, analgesia, and anxiolytic properties

Complications: negative side effects pertaining to a drug to include, respiratory depression, bradycardia, hypotension, and neurological insult