JDJCSET | Occupational Safety & Health Session

Title

Identifying Ergonomic Risk in Marching Percussion

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Occupational Safety and Health

Minor

N/A

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Julie Boyd; Dr. Yousif Abulhassan

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The “no pain, no gain” motto has long been followed when it comes to playing an instrument. Marching band members playing percussion instruments such as snare drums, tenor drums, and bass drums are subject to many repetitive movements and forceful exertions over long periods of time. The purpose of this study was to assess the ergonomic risks associated with marching percussionists through hand and body discomfort surveys, and traditional ergonomic assessment tools including the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) for Hand Activity, Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA), and Rapid Ergonomic Body Assessment (REBA). Thirteen (13) male subjects of the Murray State marching band were recruited to participate in the study: six (6) snares, three (3) tenors, and four (4) bass players. Each subject was given a body discomfort survey during and after a marching band practice. Hand discomfort survey results indicated that the thenar eminence was the greatest area of hand discomfort and pain amongst the three types of drum players. Results from RULA and REBA analyses indicated that percussionists playing the three drum types were exposed to medium risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. Whole body discomfort survey results revealed that snare and bass players experienced the highest discomfort and pain in the upper back; while tenor players experienced highest discomfort and pain in the lower back. Hand pain and discomfort results were also found to have a statistically significant effect on the scores calculated from ACGIH TLV for Hand Activity. Identifying the ergonomic risks associated with marching band percussion players would assist in bringing awareness of ergonomic principles to playing musical instruments.

Affiliations

Occupational Safety and Health

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Identifying Ergonomic Risk in Marching Percussion

The “no pain, no gain” motto has long been followed when it comes to playing an instrument. Marching band members playing percussion instruments such as snare drums, tenor drums, and bass drums are subject to many repetitive movements and forceful exertions over long periods of time. The purpose of this study was to assess the ergonomic risks associated with marching percussionists through hand and body discomfort surveys, and traditional ergonomic assessment tools including the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) for Hand Activity, Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA), and Rapid Ergonomic Body Assessment (REBA). Thirteen (13) male subjects of the Murray State marching band were recruited to participate in the study: six (6) snares, three (3) tenors, and four (4) bass players. Each subject was given a body discomfort survey during and after a marching band practice. Hand discomfort survey results indicated that the thenar eminence was the greatest area of hand discomfort and pain amongst the three types of drum players. Results from RULA and REBA analyses indicated that percussionists playing the three drum types were exposed to medium risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. Whole body discomfort survey results revealed that snare and bass players experienced the highest discomfort and pain in the upper back; while tenor players experienced highest discomfort and pain in the lower back. Hand pain and discomfort results were also found to have a statistically significant effect on the scores calculated from ACGIH TLV for Hand Activity. Identifying the ergonomic risks associated with marching band percussion players would assist in bringing awareness of ergonomic principles to playing musical instruments.