JDJCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

Attitudes Towards Mental Illness

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Social Welfare

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Michael Bordieri

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Attitudes Towards Mental Illness

BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown around 70 percent of adults experiencing mental illnesses do not access treatment (Henderson, Evans-Lacko, & Thornicroft, 2013). Among college students the rate is higher with over 80 percent of students experiencing mental illness not seeking treatment (Auerbach et al., 2016). People with mental illness experience stigma in three ways: perceived, experienced, and self-stigma (Brohan, Slade, Clement, & Thorncroft, 2013). People also experience stigma on community, individual, and institutional levels (Henderson, Evans-Lacko, &Thornicroft, 2013). These researchers offer four reasons why people do not seek treatment: lack of knowledge about mental illness and treatability, lack of knowledge of access to treatment, prejudice against mental illness, and expectation of discrimination against mental illness diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to explore stigma towards mental illness and perceived barriers to mental health treatment in a university sample.

METHODS: Undergraduate participants completed the following measures: the revised Community Living Attitude Scale (rCLAS), the Community Attitudes Towards Mental Illness (CAMI), the Marlowe Crowne Social Desirability Scale Short Form (MCSD-SF), the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire- Stigma (AAQ-S), the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21), and the Perceived Stigma and Barriers to Care analysis (PSCB). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire examining previous exposure to mental illness. Data collection is still in progress, with data from over 80 participants already obtained.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Correlations between variables will be explored examining the relationships between current distress, stigma, and perceived barriers to treatment. A psychometric analysis of the rCLAS will be performed to explore its utility in college age populations. Implications for future research will be discussed with an emphasis on identifying and intervening on factors that increase mental illness stigma.

Keywords: Attitudes, Mental Illness, Stigma, Exposure

Affiliations

Sigma Xi Poster Competition--ONLY

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Attitudes Towards Mental Illness

Attitudes Towards Mental Illness

BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown around 70 percent of adults experiencing mental illnesses do not access treatment (Henderson, Evans-Lacko, & Thornicroft, 2013). Among college students the rate is higher with over 80 percent of students experiencing mental illness not seeking treatment (Auerbach et al., 2016). People with mental illness experience stigma in three ways: perceived, experienced, and self-stigma (Brohan, Slade, Clement, & Thorncroft, 2013). People also experience stigma on community, individual, and institutional levels (Henderson, Evans-Lacko, &Thornicroft, 2013). These researchers offer four reasons why people do not seek treatment: lack of knowledge about mental illness and treatability, lack of knowledge of access to treatment, prejudice against mental illness, and expectation of discrimination against mental illness diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to explore stigma towards mental illness and perceived barriers to mental health treatment in a university sample.

METHODS: Undergraduate participants completed the following measures: the revised Community Living Attitude Scale (rCLAS), the Community Attitudes Towards Mental Illness (CAMI), the Marlowe Crowne Social Desirability Scale Short Form (MCSD-SF), the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire- Stigma (AAQ-S), the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21), and the Perceived Stigma and Barriers to Care analysis (PSCB). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire examining previous exposure to mental illness. Data collection is still in progress, with data from over 80 participants already obtained.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Correlations between variables will be explored examining the relationships between current distress, stigma, and perceived barriers to treatment. A psychometric analysis of the rCLAS will be performed to explore its utility in college age populations. Implications for future research will be discussed with an emphasis on identifying and intervening on factors that increase mental illness stigma.

Keywords: Attitudes, Mental Illness, Stigma, Exposure