JDJCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

Determination of Priority Metal Contaminants in Drinking and Source Water

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Chemistry

Minor

IET

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Bikram Subedi and Dr. Bommanna Loganathan

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Heavy metal contamination of drinking water can lead to a severe effect on the ecosystem and the public health. The major sources of contamination include industrial and domestic waste discharge as well as the natural abundance of heavy metal containing minerals. Therefore, the extent of contamination depends on source water, geological composition, and the treatment strategies including a distribution network system. In this study, twelve drinking water samples from Murray Water System network are analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectrometry for ten metals (antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, selenium, and thallium) identified as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Analytes were quantified using internal standard and linear regression equations (R2 > 0.999) from seven-point calibration curves. The triplicate recovery of spiked analytes was range from 90.9 ±5.7% (arsenic) to 105 ± 2.5% (thallium). The method detection limit of analytes in tap water ranged from 0.6 ppb (barium) to 79.8 ppb (selenium). Barium (10.2 -26.1 ppb) and calcium (4620-14 800 ppb) were detected in all (n=12) drinking water samples. Wastewater, river water, and lake water will be analyzed to determine the occurrence and fate of metal contamination.

Affiliations

Sigma Xi Poster Competition--ONLY

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Determination of Priority Metal Contaminants in Drinking and Source Water

Heavy metal contamination of drinking water can lead to a severe effect on the ecosystem and the public health. The major sources of contamination include industrial and domestic waste discharge as well as the natural abundance of heavy metal containing minerals. Therefore, the extent of contamination depends on source water, geological composition, and the treatment strategies including a distribution network system. In this study, twelve drinking water samples from Murray Water System network are analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectrometry for ten metals (antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, selenium, and thallium) identified as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Analytes were quantified using internal standard and linear regression equations (R2 > 0.999) from seven-point calibration curves. The triplicate recovery of spiked analytes was range from 90.9 ±5.7% (arsenic) to 105 ± 2.5% (thallium). The method detection limit of analytes in tap water ranged from 0.6 ppb (barium) to 79.8 ppb (selenium). Barium (10.2 -26.1 ppb) and calcium (4620-14 800 ppb) were detected in all (n=12) drinking water samples. Wastewater, river water, and lake water will be analyzed to determine the occurrence and fate of metal contamination.