JDJCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

An Integrated Study Using In Situ Data Collection, Satellite Imagery and GIS to Map Invasive Plant Species in Western Kentucky.

Presenter Information

Travis WestFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Geosciences / Geographic Information Sciences

Minor

N/A

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Haluk Cetin, PhD.

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The need to understand the complexities of environmental systems, processes and changes is widely recognized. One complexity introduced by humans is invasive plant species. The purpose of this study was to use ground locations of known invasive plant species, such as Pueraria montana (Kudzu), in conjunction with satellite imagery and geographic information systems to produce a map of invasive species coverage in the region. This coverage was compared with land use/land cover (LULC) change detection of the study areas using an unsupervised classification and a post-classification comparison technique. Landsat data ranging from 1992 (Landsat-Thematic Mapper) to 2016 (Landsat-8) were used. Correlations between increases in LULC changes are noted and compared to any correlations in the ecosystem changes of the area in response to climate change. Results of the study are expected to show the impact of developing areas on invasive species and to provide a baseline study for Landsat-8 sensor to examine effects of global climate change on the environment.

Affiliations

Sigma Xi Poster Competition--ONLY

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An Integrated Study Using In Situ Data Collection, Satellite Imagery and GIS to Map Invasive Plant Species in Western Kentucky.

The need to understand the complexities of environmental systems, processes and changes is widely recognized. One complexity introduced by humans is invasive plant species. The purpose of this study was to use ground locations of known invasive plant species, such as Pueraria montana (Kudzu), in conjunction with satellite imagery and geographic information systems to produce a map of invasive species coverage in the region. This coverage was compared with land use/land cover (LULC) change detection of the study areas using an unsupervised classification and a post-classification comparison technique. Landsat data ranging from 1992 (Landsat-Thematic Mapper) to 2016 (Landsat-8) were used. Correlations between increases in LULC changes are noted and compared to any correlations in the ecosystem changes of the area in response to climate change. Results of the study are expected to show the impact of developing areas on invasive species and to provide a baseline study for Landsat-8 sensor to examine effects of global climate change on the environment.