Honors College | Session 3

Title

Thiol-Ene Polymeric Ionic Liquids: Conductivity and Fabrication by 3D Printing

Presenter Information

Landon FikeFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Chemistry (Pre-med) and Biology (Pre-med)

Minor

Mathematics

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. R. Daniel Johnson, PhD.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Room temperature ionic liquids are an area of extensive research due to their unique properties which lead to a multitude of applications. Many ionic liquids can be incorporated into polymers to produce polymeric ionic liquids or PILs. This research examined the conductive properties of a series of PILs produced via thiol-ene photopolymerization. The ionic liquid used was 1,3-bisallylimidazolium [NTf2] and the multifunctional thiol used was PTMP. The molar ratio of these two components was varied to give the following thiol:ene ratios: 1.0:1.0, 1.0:1.5, 1.0:2.0, 1.0:2.5, and 1.0:3.0. The conductive properties were studied by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy using modified MacDonald theory to obtain conductivity data from the electrode polarization which gives information on free ion concentration and ion mobility within the polymer.

The PILs were found to have good conductivity as a result of ion mobility and the high number of free ions within the polymers. Once the PILs were shown to have conductivity, their potential for fabrication by 3D printing was examined using the 1.0:2.0 ratio. First, the PIL was subjected to a series of tests examining its potential to behave as a resin for 3D printing. After it was shown that important criteria were met, a 3D printing was performed. The initial printing was successful; however, the conditions of printing should be refined in the future. In addition, the mechanical and conductive properties of the printed objects should be compared favorably against the properties obtained by a standard slab casting procedure—illustrating their potential for further applications like microfluidics.

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Thiol-Ene Polymeric Ionic Liquids: Conductivity and Fabrication by 3D Printing

Room temperature ionic liquids are an area of extensive research due to their unique properties which lead to a multitude of applications. Many ionic liquids can be incorporated into polymers to produce polymeric ionic liquids or PILs. This research examined the conductive properties of a series of PILs produced via thiol-ene photopolymerization. The ionic liquid used was 1,3-bisallylimidazolium [NTf2] and the multifunctional thiol used was PTMP. The molar ratio of these two components was varied to give the following thiol:ene ratios: 1.0:1.0, 1.0:1.5, 1.0:2.0, 1.0:2.5, and 1.0:3.0. The conductive properties were studied by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy using modified MacDonald theory to obtain conductivity data from the electrode polarization which gives information on free ion concentration and ion mobility within the polymer.

The PILs were found to have good conductivity as a result of ion mobility and the high number of free ions within the polymers. Once the PILs were shown to have conductivity, their potential for fabrication by 3D printing was examined using the 1.0:2.0 ratio. First, the PIL was subjected to a series of tests examining its potential to behave as a resin for 3D printing. After it was shown that important criteria were met, a 3D printing was performed. The initial printing was successful; however, the conditions of printing should be refined in the future. In addition, the mechanical and conductive properties of the printed objects should be compared favorably against the properties obtained by a standard slab casting procedure—illustrating their potential for further applications like microfluidics.