Honors College | Session 3

Title

X-Ray Analysis of Metals Under Stress

Presenter Information

Jesse TappFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Physics/Mathematics

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Hamid Kobraei, Phd; Jeffery Osborne, Phd

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Two common studies in material science are stress analysis, and x-ray diffractometry. Stress analysis examines how materials behave when placed under stress and are deformed by that stress. In particular, metals are unique in that they can undergo relatively large amounts of plastic deformation before mechanical failure, that is breaking. In contrast, x-ray diffractometry investigates the microscopic properties of the material. It works by emitting x-rays of a particular frequency incident on the material being studied and analyzing the reflected beam at different angles. The x-rays interfere with one another differently at each angle creating an interference pattern which unique to the material. If the material is crystalline like most metals, this pattern or profile can also give us information on the nature of the material crystal lattice. Such information as geometry, planar lengths, and purity can determined from this profile. A question that follows these studies is how the effects of stress and deformation on a material manifest on the atomic scale. The consensus is that deformation manifests by have sheets of the material translates with respective to one another. However, this study hypothesizes that in addition to translation, the crystal lattice cells deform individually because of this force.

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Honors College Senior Thesis Presentation

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X-Ray Analysis of Metals Under Stress

Two common studies in material science are stress analysis, and x-ray diffractometry. Stress analysis examines how materials behave when placed under stress and are deformed by that stress. In particular, metals are unique in that they can undergo relatively large amounts of plastic deformation before mechanical failure, that is breaking. In contrast, x-ray diffractometry investigates the microscopic properties of the material. It works by emitting x-rays of a particular frequency incident on the material being studied and analyzing the reflected beam at different angles. The x-rays interfere with one another differently at each angle creating an interference pattern which unique to the material. If the material is crystalline like most metals, this pattern or profile can also give us information on the nature of the material crystal lattice. Such information as geometry, planar lengths, and purity can determined from this profile. A question that follows these studies is how the effects of stress and deformation on a material manifest on the atomic scale. The consensus is that deformation manifests by have sheets of the material translates with respective to one another. However, this study hypothesizes that in addition to translation, the crystal lattice cells deform individually because of this force.