SNHP | Senior Nursing Poster Session

Title

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Presenter Information

Kylee LawsonFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Hobbs; Mrs. Coleman

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Brown and Edwards (2015) defined neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) as “a condition or state in which neonates experience withdrawal symptoms after in utero exposure to opioids or other substances from maternal use,” (p. 305). The use and abuse of opioids has increased substantially in the last decade. Therefore, the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) has increased as well. Once the child is born and the substance is taken away, they can experience withdrawals. There are many pharmacological protocols to reduce withdrawal symptoms, but there are also interventions that nurses can implement. The discussed research showed that newborns who roomed-in with their mother had shorter lengths of stay, decreased hospital expenses, and required less pharmacological treatment. Mothers who are not taking illicit drugs and have no other contraindications are candidates for breastfeeding. When mothers breastfed their infants with NAS, the newborns had shorter hospital stays, lower doses of pharmacological therapy, and decreased Finnegan scores. Another obstacle is interacting with the mothers. Hospitals can implement these changes by educating their staff, adding private rooms to their neonatal intensive care units (NICU), and encouraging breastfeeding to eligible mothers.

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Senior Nursing Poster Session

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Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Brown and Edwards (2015) defined neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) as “a condition or state in which neonates experience withdrawal symptoms after in utero exposure to opioids or other substances from maternal use,” (p. 305). The use and abuse of opioids has increased substantially in the last decade. Therefore, the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) has increased as well. Once the child is born and the substance is taken away, they can experience withdrawals. There are many pharmacological protocols to reduce withdrawal symptoms, but there are also interventions that nurses can implement. The discussed research showed that newborns who roomed-in with their mother had shorter lengths of stay, decreased hospital expenses, and required less pharmacological treatment. Mothers who are not taking illicit drugs and have no other contraindications are candidates for breastfeeding. When mothers breastfed their infants with NAS, the newborns had shorter hospital stays, lower doses of pharmacological therapy, and decreased Finnegan scores. Another obstacle is interacting with the mothers. Hospitals can implement these changes by educating their staff, adding private rooms to their neonatal intensive care units (NICU), and encouraging breastfeeding to eligible mothers.