SNHP | Senior Nursing Poster Session

Title

Pressure Ulcer Prevention with Prophylactic Foam Dressings

Presenter Information

Ali LampertFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Marcia Hobbs; Mrs. Jennifer Coleman

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

In 2008, under the Affordable Health Care Act, insurance ceased reimbursement for extended hospital stay and treatment of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (Kalowes et al., 2016). A single hospital-acquired pressure ulcer may cost a hospital between 2,000 and 20,000 dollars, depending on the location and severity of the tissue damage, and may extend a patient’s stay up 14 days (Kalowes et al., 2016). One study claimed hospitals spend approximately 1,200 to 1,600 dollars per day to treat the pressure ulcer/s of one patient (Byrne, 2016). The skin is the first barrier of defense to protect patients from the harmful pathogens they may encounter in the hospital. Pressure ulcers compromise that barrier and provide a portal of entry for infection. Bed rest is often unavoidable and sometimes necessary for critically ill patients. Pressure ulcers are a common adverse effect of immobility, but many can be easily prevented.

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Senior Nursing Poster Session

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Pressure Ulcer Prevention with Prophylactic Foam Dressings

In 2008, under the Affordable Health Care Act, insurance ceased reimbursement for extended hospital stay and treatment of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (Kalowes et al., 2016). A single hospital-acquired pressure ulcer may cost a hospital between 2,000 and 20,000 dollars, depending on the location and severity of the tissue damage, and may extend a patient’s stay up 14 days (Kalowes et al., 2016). One study claimed hospitals spend approximately 1,200 to 1,600 dollars per day to treat the pressure ulcer/s of one patient (Byrne, 2016). The skin is the first barrier of defense to protect patients from the harmful pathogens they may encounter in the hospital. Pressure ulcers compromise that barrier and provide a portal of entry for infection. Bed rest is often unavoidable and sometimes necessary for critically ill patients. Pressure ulcers are a common adverse effect of immobility, but many can be easily prevented.