Title

The Few, the Proud, the Distinct: The Relationship Between Belonging and Distinctiveness in Sport Team Choice

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Biology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dan Wann, PhD

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

An individual’s personality is a key component in the decision-making process (Holland, Gottfredson, & Power; 1980). Personality is a multifaceted construct made up by several parts including belonging and distinctiveness (Vignoles, Regalia, Manzi, Golledge, & Scabini; 2006). Past research has shown that distinctiveness is both an innate and biological need (Lynn & Snyder, 2002; Eastwick & Hunt, 2014). When one satisfies the need to belong, there tends to be an increase in mood (Sheldon & Bettencourt, 2002). These concepts are also driving forces of behavior, including sport and media consumption (Tian, Bearden, & Hunter 2001; Theodorakis, Wann, Nassis, & Luellen; 2012).

For this study, the following hypotheses were made: 1) Individuals high in the need for belonging and low in the need for distinctiveness will choose the more popular team. 2) Individuals high in the need for distinctiveness and low in the need for belonging will choose the less popular team.

Participants were asked to read a prompt that described a fictional scenario involving them moving to Perth, Australia. The prompt described cricket as being the most popular sport in Perth. Furthermore, there are two teams with equal success within Perth. One team had a following of 225,000 fans, while the other had a following of 975,000 fans. They were then asked to select which team they would follow, complete the Need to Belong Scale (Leary, Kelly, Cottrell, & Schreindorfer; 2013), and the Need for Uniqueness Scale (Lynn & Harris; 1997). Results will be discussed.

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Psychology Department Panel: Brummer Colloquium Series

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The Few, the Proud, the Distinct: The Relationship Between Belonging and Distinctiveness in Sport Team Choice

An individual’s personality is a key component in the decision-making process (Holland, Gottfredson, & Power; 1980). Personality is a multifaceted construct made up by several parts including belonging and distinctiveness (Vignoles, Regalia, Manzi, Golledge, & Scabini; 2006). Past research has shown that distinctiveness is both an innate and biological need (Lynn & Snyder, 2002; Eastwick & Hunt, 2014). When one satisfies the need to belong, there tends to be an increase in mood (Sheldon & Bettencourt, 2002). These concepts are also driving forces of behavior, including sport and media consumption (Tian, Bearden, & Hunter 2001; Theodorakis, Wann, Nassis, & Luellen; 2012).

For this study, the following hypotheses were made: 1) Individuals high in the need for belonging and low in the need for distinctiveness will choose the more popular team. 2) Individuals high in the need for distinctiveness and low in the need for belonging will choose the less popular team.

Participants were asked to read a prompt that described a fictional scenario involving them moving to Perth, Australia. The prompt described cricket as being the most popular sport in Perth. Furthermore, there are two teams with equal success within Perth. One team had a following of 225,000 fans, while the other had a following of 975,000 fans. They were then asked to select which team they would follow, complete the Need to Belong Scale (Leary, Kelly, Cottrell, & Schreindorfer; 2013), and the Need for Uniqueness Scale (Lynn & Harris; 1997). Results will be discussed.