Title

Exploring Trauma Informed Care and Employees Well-Being

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Nonprofit Leadership Studies

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Marie Karlsson

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Exploring Trauma Informed Care and Employees’ Well-being

When considering the complexity of trauma, recent research has shifted to examine employees providing services and the structure of the organization (Hales, Kusumaul & Nochajski, 2017). This is known as “trauma informed care” that examines factors such as trust, collaboration, empowerment, physical and emotional safety and choice (Harris & Fallot, 2001). The current study expands on this research by surveying employees from Rape Crisis and Child Advocacy Centers across the state of Kentucky. It was hypothesized that the more trauma informed factors an organization displays the less psychological distress experienced by employees. Fifty five participants completed the online survey, White (89%) and female (94%) with a mean age of 37.94 (SD = 9.91). They reported working in various capacities within their organizations (21 direct services, 16 administration, 4 support staff, and 16 in some other capacity). Results from a Pearson’s R correlation indicated significance between trauma-informed factors in the organization and psychological distress (r = -.37, p =.008). Furthermore, employee diagnosis of a mental illness (r = .39, p =.006), perceived social support (rs = -.43 - .39, ps < .01), and job satisfaction (r = -.28, p = .048) were significantly correlated with psychological distress. Age (r = -.27, p = .057 ) was also correlated to psychological distress and time spent in current position with trauma informed factors (r = -.27, p = .051). The findings have the potential to promote overall well-being in employees providing these services which could increase quality of care to trauma survivors.

Keywords: Trust, Collaboration, Empowerment, Choice, Safety

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Psychology Department Panel: Brummer Colloquium Series

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Exploring Trauma Informed Care and Employees Well-Being

Exploring Trauma Informed Care and Employees’ Well-being

When considering the complexity of trauma, recent research has shifted to examine employees providing services and the structure of the organization (Hales, Kusumaul & Nochajski, 2017). This is known as “trauma informed care” that examines factors such as trust, collaboration, empowerment, physical and emotional safety and choice (Harris & Fallot, 2001). The current study expands on this research by surveying employees from Rape Crisis and Child Advocacy Centers across the state of Kentucky. It was hypothesized that the more trauma informed factors an organization displays the less psychological distress experienced by employees. Fifty five participants completed the online survey, White (89%) and female (94%) with a mean age of 37.94 (SD = 9.91). They reported working in various capacities within their organizations (21 direct services, 16 administration, 4 support staff, and 16 in some other capacity). Results from a Pearson’s R correlation indicated significance between trauma-informed factors in the organization and psychological distress (r = -.37, p =.008). Furthermore, employee diagnosis of a mental illness (r = .39, p =.006), perceived social support (rs = -.43 - .39, ps < .01), and job satisfaction (r = -.28, p = .048) were significantly correlated with psychological distress. Age (r = -.27, p = .057 ) was also correlated to psychological distress and time spent in current position with trauma informed factors (r = -.27, p = .051). The findings have the potential to promote overall well-being in employees providing these services which could increase quality of care to trauma survivors.

Keywords: Trust, Collaboration, Empowerment, Choice, Safety