Title

The Effects of Individualistic and Collectivistic Orientations on Mental Health Stigma

Presenter Information

Sabrina PrattFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Spanish

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Michael Bordieri

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Mental health stigma is one of the leading determinants of help-seeking behavior for those with a mental illness (Eisenberg, Downs, Golberstein, Zivin, 2009). Previous research suggest that mental health stigma differs across various cultural identities and values (Menke & Flynn, 2009). Extending upon current research, the present study seeks to examine the relationship between mental health stigma and cultural influences, specifically the degree to which individuals endorse collectivistic or individualistic orientations. This study attempts to explore this relationship by comparing scores on the Vertical-Horizontal Individualism-Collectivism scale (Cozma, 2011) with stigma towards persons with depression and schizophrenia. I hypothesize that participants who score higher on the Depressive Stigma Scale (Griffiths, Christensen, Jorm, Evans, & Groves, 2004) will endorse higher scores on the collectivistic subscales on the Vertical-Horizontal Individualism-Collectivism Scale. In regard to schizophrenia, I hypothesize that, regardless of orientation, participants will have higher levels of stigma towards the schizophrenia vignette than the depression vignette.

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Psychology Department Panel: Brummer Colloquium Series

Other Scholars Week Event

Psychology Dept./Honors College

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The Effects of Individualistic and Collectivistic Orientations on Mental Health Stigma

Mental health stigma is one of the leading determinants of help-seeking behavior for those with a mental illness (Eisenberg, Downs, Golberstein, Zivin, 2009). Previous research suggest that mental health stigma differs across various cultural identities and values (Menke & Flynn, 2009). Extending upon current research, the present study seeks to examine the relationship between mental health stigma and cultural influences, specifically the degree to which individuals endorse collectivistic or individualistic orientations. This study attempts to explore this relationship by comparing scores on the Vertical-Horizontal Individualism-Collectivism scale (Cozma, 2011) with stigma towards persons with depression and schizophrenia. I hypothesize that participants who score higher on the Depressive Stigma Scale (Griffiths, Christensen, Jorm, Evans, & Groves, 2004) will endorse higher scores on the collectivistic subscales on the Vertical-Horizontal Individualism-Collectivism Scale. In regard to schizophrenia, I hypothesize that, regardless of orientation, participants will have higher levels of stigma towards the schizophrenia vignette than the depression vignette.