Title

Aggravation in Parenting as a Moderator of Maternal Involvement and Child Social Skills Development

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Clinical Psychology

2nd Student Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Faculty/Staff

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Esther Malm, Ph.D.

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

The development of social skills in children prepares them for a future of healthy interactions, effective communication, and building meaningful relationships. Parental involvement as well as aggravation in parenting contribute differently to the development of children’s social skills. Previous literature suggests higher levels of parental involvement is related to higher levels of child social skills ratings, while decreased ratings of aggravation in parenting are associated with both higher ratings of maternal involvement and child social skills. Whereas existing literature have explored the impact of non-resident father involvement, academic consequences, and dual-parent homes on the development of child social skills, few studies examine the effects of aggravation in parenting as a moderator in the development of child social skills in single-parent homes. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mother's self-report of aggravation in parenting and maternal involvement at age 3 on child social skills assessed at age 5. We hypothesized that maternal involvement and aggravation in parenting will directly affect child social skills at age 5, especially for children in single parent homes. Secondly, we hypothesized that an aggravation in parenting will also moderate the relationship between parental involvement at age 3 and child social skills at age 5. Secondary data from Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study longitudinal data set was used to explore this relationship. Results indicate that while parental status was significantly associated with social skills development, there were no significant associations between the two predictors at age 3 and social skills at age 5. Discussion of results and future directions will be presented during scholar’s week.

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Psychology Department Panel: Completed Projects

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Aggravation in Parenting as a Moderator of Maternal Involvement and Child Social Skills Development

The development of social skills in children prepares them for a future of healthy interactions, effective communication, and building meaningful relationships. Parental involvement as well as aggravation in parenting contribute differently to the development of children’s social skills. Previous literature suggests higher levels of parental involvement is related to higher levels of child social skills ratings, while decreased ratings of aggravation in parenting are associated with both higher ratings of maternal involvement and child social skills. Whereas existing literature have explored the impact of non-resident father involvement, academic consequences, and dual-parent homes on the development of child social skills, few studies examine the effects of aggravation in parenting as a moderator in the development of child social skills in single-parent homes. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mother's self-report of aggravation in parenting and maternal involvement at age 3 on child social skills assessed at age 5. We hypothesized that maternal involvement and aggravation in parenting will directly affect child social skills at age 5, especially for children in single parent homes. Secondly, we hypothesized that an aggravation in parenting will also moderate the relationship between parental involvement at age 3 and child social skills at age 5. Secondary data from Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study longitudinal data set was used to explore this relationship. Results indicate that while parental status was significantly associated with social skills development, there were no significant associations between the two predictors at age 3 and social skills at age 5. Discussion of results and future directions will be presented during scholar’s week.