Title

Flexibility in the Brain and Muscles: Examining Psychological Flexibility, Athletic Identity, and Stigma within Sport Culture

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Clinical Psychology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Michael Bordieri

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Flexibility in the Brain and Muscles: Examining Psychological Flexibility, Athletic Identity, and Stigma within Sport Culture

Individuals with physical and intellectual disabilities often experience stigma related to other disabilities. Previous research around stigma towards those with disabilities has examined types of stigma and various components that play a role in stigmatizing behaviors and attitudes (Brohan, Slade, Clement, & Thorncroft, 2013 & Henderson, Evans-Lacko, &Thornicroft, 2013). One context in which stigma towards physical disabilities specifically has been examined is sport culture. Sport specific attributions such as athletic identity, could be a possible component of stigma towards physical disabilities within the sport context (Perrier, Smith, Strachan, & Latimer-Cheung, 2014). Broadly, psychological flexibility has also been examined in stigma research and could also be involved in stigma occurring within the sport culture (Masuda, Hill, Morgan, & Cohen, 2012). Stigma, athletic identity, and psychological flexibility have been researched separately but through this project will be looked at together in hopes to better understand their relationships with one another within the specific context of sport. Definitions, methods of measurement, and previous research of stigma, psychological flexibility, and athletic identity will be discussed throughout this presentation.

Keywords: Psychological Flexibility, Stigma, Athletic Identity, Physical Disabilities

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Psychology Department Panel: Projects In-Process

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Flexibility in the Brain and Muscles: Examining Psychological Flexibility, Athletic Identity, and Stigma within Sport Culture

Flexibility in the Brain and Muscles: Examining Psychological Flexibility, Athletic Identity, and Stigma within Sport Culture

Individuals with physical and intellectual disabilities often experience stigma related to other disabilities. Previous research around stigma towards those with disabilities has examined types of stigma and various components that play a role in stigmatizing behaviors and attitudes (Brohan, Slade, Clement, & Thorncroft, 2013 & Henderson, Evans-Lacko, &Thornicroft, 2013). One context in which stigma towards physical disabilities specifically has been examined is sport culture. Sport specific attributions such as athletic identity, could be a possible component of stigma towards physical disabilities within the sport context (Perrier, Smith, Strachan, & Latimer-Cheung, 2014). Broadly, psychological flexibility has also been examined in stigma research and could also be involved in stigma occurring within the sport culture (Masuda, Hill, Morgan, & Cohen, 2012). Stigma, athletic identity, and psychological flexibility have been researched separately but through this project will be looked at together in hopes to better understand their relationships with one another within the specific context of sport. Definitions, methods of measurement, and previous research of stigma, psychological flexibility, and athletic identity will be discussed throughout this presentation.

Keywords: Psychological Flexibility, Stigma, Athletic Identity, Physical Disabilities