JDJCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

Improved structural heterogeneity in a reconstructed stream affects macroinvertebrate community composition, abundance, and density

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Watershed Science

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Michael B Flinn

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Hatchery Creek is a restored stream near Jamestown, KY that drains from a cold-water fish hatchery. The degraded channel of Hatchery Creek caused large sediment plumes in the Lower Cumberland River, and was reconstructed to decrease sediment loss and create a self-sustaining trout population. We predicted that improved bed grade and habitat quality in the reconstructed stream would improve macroinvertebrate diversity. Macroinvertebrate communities were sampled seasonally for 2 years before and after the reconstruction. The macroinvertebrate community included 8-13 taxa, dominated by low scoring and very-tolerant taxa. Macroinvertebrate density and biomass were over 100,000 ind/m2 and 10 g/m2 respectively in the pre-restored channel. Macroinvertebrate taxa richness increased to 17 taxa, with an increase in EPT taxa. Macroinvertebrate community recovery suggests combining engineering and ecology to create a ”field of dreams” may be a worthwhile restoration technique.

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Sigma Xi Poster Competition

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Improved structural heterogeneity in a reconstructed stream affects macroinvertebrate community composition, abundance, and density

Hatchery Creek is a restored stream near Jamestown, KY that drains from a cold-water fish hatchery. The degraded channel of Hatchery Creek caused large sediment plumes in the Lower Cumberland River, and was reconstructed to decrease sediment loss and create a self-sustaining trout population. We predicted that improved bed grade and habitat quality in the reconstructed stream would improve macroinvertebrate diversity. Macroinvertebrate communities were sampled seasonally for 2 years before and after the reconstruction. The macroinvertebrate community included 8-13 taxa, dominated by low scoring and very-tolerant taxa. Macroinvertebrate density and biomass were over 100,000 ind/m2 and 10 g/m2 respectively in the pre-restored channel. Macroinvertebrate taxa richness increased to 17 taxa, with an increase in EPT taxa. Macroinvertebrate community recovery suggests combining engineering and ecology to create a ”field of dreams” may be a worthwhile restoration technique.