JDJCSET | Sigma Xi Poster Competition

Title

The Detection of Exposed Clay Sources Using Hyperspectral EO-1 Hyperion Data

Presenter Information

Zach J. ElliottFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Graduate

Major

Geoarchaeology

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Haluk Cetin

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

The detection of clay plays an important part in both archaeology and in the building of new infrastructure. With archaeology it is important to know where prehistoric people were likely obtaining the clay they used for ceramics. And for infrastructure it’s important to know where expansive clays are located in abundance in order to avoid building in these areas. The use of hyperspectral imaging makes this detection of clay across a large area much easier than it would be on foot. However this is not a perfect technique since it requires the clay to be exposed on the surface so that it can be identified by the instrument. Because of this an open clay pit currently in use by a nearby business in Hickory, Kentucky was used as a control to test the band ratio used in the detection of clay. Other potential hotspots in the image were compared with the Hickory Clay Pit in order to ascertain whether they had identical characteristics. Multiple potential clay sources appeared in the image; however, none were as large as the Hickory Clay Pit.

Spring Scholars Week 2018 Event

Sigma Xi Poster Competition

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The Detection of Exposed Clay Sources Using Hyperspectral EO-1 Hyperion Data

The detection of clay plays an important part in both archaeology and in the building of new infrastructure. With archaeology it is important to know where prehistoric people were likely obtaining the clay they used for ceramics. And for infrastructure it’s important to know where expansive clays are located in abundance in order to avoid building in these areas. The use of hyperspectral imaging makes this detection of clay across a large area much easier than it would be on foot. However this is not a perfect technique since it requires the clay to be exposed on the surface so that it can be identified by the instrument. Because of this an open clay pit currently in use by a nearby business in Hickory, Kentucky was used as a control to test the band ratio used in the detection of clay. Other potential hotspots in the image were compared with the Hickory Clay Pit in order to ascertain whether they had identical characteristics. Multiple potential clay sources appeared in the image; however, none were as large as the Hickory Clay Pit.