Poster Title

An in vitro Study on Skin Protection Across the UV Spectra

Presenter Information

Cheyenne BooneFollow

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Chemistry

Minor

Music

Institution

Kentucky State University

KY House District #

57

KY Senate District #

7

Department

Natural Sciences

Abstract

Skin cancer is the number one cancer in the United States. Lack of awareness of how harmful UV radiation is could be the cause of the over two million cases reported since 2012. It appears that there is not a lot information on the active ingredients used in sunscreens. Some of the compounds have been linked to birth defects, hormone disruptions, and the bleaching of coral reefs. Samples of commonly used sunscreens (both sprays and creams), cosmetic foundation, essential oils, lotions, and three pure organic actives were tested at specific concentrations and ran through a UV spectrometer. The results have shown that there is little to no protection being provided in the UVA spectra (320-400 nm) which makes up over 95% of the radiation that we are exposed to daily. Although UVB rays (320-290 nm) are considered to be the main source of sunburn and cancer, it cannot be ignored that UVA rays can produce the same outcome, especially since it penetrates the skin deeper than UVB rays. By producing active ingredients that effectively block UVA light and the lower end of the visible spectra (such as blue light), broad spectrum protection can be achieved.

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An in vitro Study on Skin Protection Across the UV Spectra

Skin cancer is the number one cancer in the United States. Lack of awareness of how harmful UV radiation is could be the cause of the over two million cases reported since 2012. It appears that there is not a lot information on the active ingredients used in sunscreens. Some of the compounds have been linked to birth defects, hormone disruptions, and the bleaching of coral reefs. Samples of commonly used sunscreens (both sprays and creams), cosmetic foundation, essential oils, lotions, and three pure organic actives were tested at specific concentrations and ran through a UV spectrometer. The results have shown that there is little to no protection being provided in the UVA spectra (320-400 nm) which makes up over 95% of the radiation that we are exposed to daily. Although UVB rays (320-290 nm) are considered to be the main source of sunburn and cancer, it cannot be ignored that UVA rays can produce the same outcome, especially since it penetrates the skin deeper than UVB rays. By producing active ingredients that effectively block UVA light and the lower end of the visible spectra (such as blue light), broad spectrum protection can be achieved.