Poster Title

Inhibition Efficiency of Lactobacillus acidophilus Bacteria on Candida albicans Growth

Presenter Information

Sydney GordonFollow

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Major

Craft Academy

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

76

KY Senate District #

13

Department

Biology and Chemistry

Abstract

Lactobacillus acidophilusis an abundant gram-positive bacterium commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract and in female reproductive tract. It is used as a probiotic and it is suggested that L. acidophilus may affect the ability of Candida albicans to adhere to vaginal cells and therefore decrease the chance of a yeast infection. Our project examined the effect of microgravity on of cultures of L. acidophilus and C. albicans. In our experiment, we utilized a dual-culture plating method to investigate the potential of L.acidophilus to impede the growth of C. albicans. Our experiment was flown to the International Space Station and incubated for 30 days. Our results indicate that L. acidophilus grown in microgravity produce larger colonies and had an increased growth compared to cultures at normal gravity. It also appeared that L. acidophilus may have an enhanced ability to prevent growth of C. albicans in a microgravity environment.

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Inhibition Efficiency of Lactobacillus acidophilus Bacteria on Candida albicans Growth

Lactobacillus acidophilusis an abundant gram-positive bacterium commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract and in female reproductive tract. It is used as a probiotic and it is suggested that L. acidophilus may affect the ability of Candida albicans to adhere to vaginal cells and therefore decrease the chance of a yeast infection. Our project examined the effect of microgravity on of cultures of L. acidophilus and C. albicans. In our experiment, we utilized a dual-culture plating method to investigate the potential of L.acidophilus to impede the growth of C. albicans. Our experiment was flown to the International Space Station and incubated for 30 days. Our results indicate that L. acidophilus grown in microgravity produce larger colonies and had an increased growth compared to cultures at normal gravity. It also appeared that L. acidophilus may have an enhanced ability to prevent growth of C. albicans in a microgravity environment.