Poster Title

Blocking the Rewarding Effects of Amphetamines Using Ro 63-1908

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Neuroscience

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

KY House District #

69

KY Senate District #

69

Department

Psychological Science

Abstract

Blocking the Rewarding Effects of Amphetamines Using Ro 63-1908

Brett Torline

Northern Kentucky University: Department of Psychological Science

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Justin R. Yates

The abuse of psychostimulants has been a growing concern, especially among student populations. Drug diversion associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications is a large part of this problem. The goal of this study was to determine if the rewarding effects of psychostimulant drugs, specifically methamphetamine, can be blocked with the drug Ro 63-1908. Male rats (n = 48) were tested in a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, where one environmental context was specifically paired with the rewarding effects of methamphetamine. In Experiment 1a, rats received either an injection of methamphetamine prior to being isolated in one colored compartment (white or black) or an injection of saline (i.e., salt water) prior to being isolated to the opposite colored compartment. Thirty minutes before receiving the methamphetamine/saline treatment, rats received an injection of saline mixed with 5% Tween 80. Experiments 1b and 1c were similar to Experiment 1a, with the exception that rats were injected with Ro 63-1908 (either 1.0 mg/kg or 3.0 mg/kg) 30 minutes prior to receiving methamphetamine. On the final day of testing (for each experiment), rats explored the white and black compartments of the CPP chamber for 15 minutes. The time spent in each compartment was recorded. The results showed that rats treated with Ro 63-1908 (3.0 mg/kg) prior to each methamphetamine injection spent less time in the methamphetamine-paired compartment. Importantly, the ability of Ro 63-1908 to block the rewarding effects of methamphetamine was not due to increased aversion to the drug (i.e., rats did not become sick following Ro 63-1908 treatment). Overall, these results suggest that Ro 63-1908 blocks the acquisition (i.e., early learning) of the conditioned rewarding effects of methamphetamine. Thus, targeting the receptor that Ro 63-1908 blocks may lead to the development of better treatment options for combating substance use disorders.

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Blocking the Rewarding Effects of Amphetamines Using Ro 63-1908

Blocking the Rewarding Effects of Amphetamines Using Ro 63-1908

Brett Torline

Northern Kentucky University: Department of Psychological Science

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Justin R. Yates

The abuse of psychostimulants has been a growing concern, especially among student populations. Drug diversion associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications is a large part of this problem. The goal of this study was to determine if the rewarding effects of psychostimulant drugs, specifically methamphetamine, can be blocked with the drug Ro 63-1908. Male rats (n = 48) were tested in a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, where one environmental context was specifically paired with the rewarding effects of methamphetamine. In Experiment 1a, rats received either an injection of methamphetamine prior to being isolated in one colored compartment (white or black) or an injection of saline (i.e., salt water) prior to being isolated to the opposite colored compartment. Thirty minutes before receiving the methamphetamine/saline treatment, rats received an injection of saline mixed with 5% Tween 80. Experiments 1b and 1c were similar to Experiment 1a, with the exception that rats were injected with Ro 63-1908 (either 1.0 mg/kg or 3.0 mg/kg) 30 minutes prior to receiving methamphetamine. On the final day of testing (for each experiment), rats explored the white and black compartments of the CPP chamber for 15 minutes. The time spent in each compartment was recorded. The results showed that rats treated with Ro 63-1908 (3.0 mg/kg) prior to each methamphetamine injection spent less time in the methamphetamine-paired compartment. Importantly, the ability of Ro 63-1908 to block the rewarding effects of methamphetamine was not due to increased aversion to the drug (i.e., rats did not become sick following Ro 63-1908 treatment). Overall, these results suggest that Ro 63-1908 blocks the acquisition (i.e., early learning) of the conditioned rewarding effects of methamphetamine. Thus, targeting the receptor that Ro 63-1908 blocks may lead to the development of better treatment options for combating substance use disorders.