Poster Title

Attitudes in the geoscience community on climate change in Kentucky

Presenter Information

Andrea MarroquinFollow

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Biology

Minor

honors

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

Department

Geology

Abstract

In the Fall of 2018, the Geology 294 Science and Policy class at Northern Kentucky University conducted a survey of all full-time geoscientist educators in the state of Kentucky who fall into the category of Lecturer, Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor (adjuncts were not included). The purpose of which was to get a sense of attitudes on climate change in the geoscience community in Kentucky. The total number of geoscience educators that fit these parameters was 41. A Google Form was used to create the survey, which included six questions: name (for identification purposes only), academic rank, views on climate change, institution, sub-field of geologic research, and any other comments not covered. An email to all educators was sent in October of 2018. Respondents were allowed two weeks to complete the form and provide any feedback. Pending acceptance, results will be displayed in written and graph form at Posters at the Capitol on February 21, 2019. The hypothesis is that a majority of geoscience educators fall into the category of “climate change is occurring and human-caused emissions are to blame.” Results are pending.

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Attitudes in the geoscience community on climate change in Kentucky

In the Fall of 2018, the Geology 294 Science and Policy class at Northern Kentucky University conducted a survey of all full-time geoscientist educators in the state of Kentucky who fall into the category of Lecturer, Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor (adjuncts were not included). The purpose of which was to get a sense of attitudes on climate change in the geoscience community in Kentucky. The total number of geoscience educators that fit these parameters was 41. A Google Form was used to create the survey, which included six questions: name (for identification purposes only), academic rank, views on climate change, institution, sub-field of geologic research, and any other comments not covered. An email to all educators was sent in October of 2018. Respondents were allowed two weeks to complete the form and provide any feedback. Pending acceptance, results will be displayed in written and graph form at Posters at the Capitol on February 21, 2019. The hypothesis is that a majority of geoscience educators fall into the category of “climate change is occurring and human-caused emissions are to blame.” Results are pending.