Poster Title

L-Serine Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species Yield in Cisplatin Treated Zebrafish Utricles

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Major

Biology

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

2nd Student Major

Biology

Institution

Western Kentucky University

KY House District #

7

KY Senate District #

8

Department

Dept. of Biology

Abstract

Cisplatin is a chemotherapy compound effective against a variety of cancers. However, it can act as an ototoxin and cause hearing loss by promoting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in auditory tissues. The antioxidant amino acid, L-serine has been hypothesized to lower levels of cisplatin-mediated ROS. In this project, we investigated whether L-serine can reduce cisplatin-mediated ROS production in auditory tissue and potentially act as an otoprotectant during cisplatin chemotherapy. We used a zebrafish utricular tissue culture system and fluorescent ROS indicator dye to spectrophotometrically measure if L-serine could decrease reactive oxygen species levels in cisplatin-treated tissues. We found that cisplatin treatment increased ROS yield in the utricular tissue while L-serine treatment alone did not alter ROS levels. Interestingly, we also found that equimolar L-serine treatment with cisplatin restored ROS to control levels. These results could be due to L-serine acting as an ROS scavenger. However, it is possible that L-serine could chemically inactivate cisplatin in these tissues. Future experiments are needed to see if L-serine can act as an otoprotectant in auditory tissue without mitigating the effects of cisplatin in cancer cells.

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L-Serine Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species Yield in Cisplatin Treated Zebrafish Utricles

Cisplatin is a chemotherapy compound effective against a variety of cancers. However, it can act as an ototoxin and cause hearing loss by promoting reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in auditory tissues. The antioxidant amino acid, L-serine has been hypothesized to lower levels of cisplatin-mediated ROS. In this project, we investigated whether L-serine can reduce cisplatin-mediated ROS production in auditory tissue and potentially act as an otoprotectant during cisplatin chemotherapy. We used a zebrafish utricular tissue culture system and fluorescent ROS indicator dye to spectrophotometrically measure if L-serine could decrease reactive oxygen species levels in cisplatin-treated tissues. We found that cisplatin treatment increased ROS yield in the utricular tissue while L-serine treatment alone did not alter ROS levels. Interestingly, we also found that equimolar L-serine treatment with cisplatin restored ROS to control levels. These results could be due to L-serine acting as an ROS scavenger. However, it is possible that L-serine could chemically inactivate cisplatin in these tissues. Future experiments are needed to see if L-serine can act as an otoprotectant in auditory tissue without mitigating the effects of cisplatin in cancer cells.