Poster Title

Physical Properties of Engineered Nanocomposites for Defense Applications

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Physics and Mathematics

Minor

Chemistry

Institution

Western Kentucky University

KY House District #

47

KY Senate District #

7

Department

Physics and Astronomy

Abstract

Polymer nanocomposites are significant for modern and future technologies (aerospace, defense, water purification etc.) due to their tailored properties, lightweight and low cost. However, ‘forward’ engineered polymer (host matrix) composites with smaller size nanoparticles (guest) providing desired properties targeting specific applications remains a challenging task as they depend largely on nanoparticles size, shape and loading (volume fraction). This study develops polymer nanocomposites impregnated with ‘organic-inorganic’ silsesquioxane nanoparticles and graphene nanoribbons, and investigates microscopic structure and dynamics of interfacial layer to predict macroscale properties. The nanocomposites consist of poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) polymer (segment ~5nm) with spherical silsesquioxane nanoparticles (diameter ~2-5nm) and planar nitrogenated graphene nanoribbons (lateral dimension ~5-10 nm), both with attractive (hydrogen bonding and electrostatic) interactions. This approach reinforces the role of molecular parameters controlling the structure and dynamics of interfacial layer in predicting properties. The transmission electron microscopy will reveal microscopic structure and the lattice bonding, interfacial stress transfer and conjugation length are determined from micro-Raman spectroscopy. The glass transition temperature, Tg, obtained using differential scanning calorimetry reveals positive shift in Tg values with nanoparticles loadings. We used temperature dependent broadband dielectric spectroscopy to gain fundamental insights into the interfacial layer and diffusion dynamics above and below Tg and to establish quantitative microstructure-property correlations. KY NSF EPSCoR REG funding is acknowledged.

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Physical Properties of Engineered Nanocomposites for Defense Applications

Polymer nanocomposites are significant for modern and future technologies (aerospace, defense, water purification etc.) due to their tailored properties, lightweight and low cost. However, ‘forward’ engineered polymer (host matrix) composites with smaller size nanoparticles (guest) providing desired properties targeting specific applications remains a challenging task as they depend largely on nanoparticles size, shape and loading (volume fraction). This study develops polymer nanocomposites impregnated with ‘organic-inorganic’ silsesquioxane nanoparticles and graphene nanoribbons, and investigates microscopic structure and dynamics of interfacial layer to predict macroscale properties. The nanocomposites consist of poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) polymer (segment ~5nm) with spherical silsesquioxane nanoparticles (diameter ~2-5nm) and planar nitrogenated graphene nanoribbons (lateral dimension ~5-10 nm), both with attractive (hydrogen bonding and electrostatic) interactions. This approach reinforces the role of molecular parameters controlling the structure and dynamics of interfacial layer in predicting properties. The transmission electron microscopy will reveal microscopic structure and the lattice bonding, interfacial stress transfer and conjugation length are determined from micro-Raman spectroscopy. The glass transition temperature, Tg, obtained using differential scanning calorimetry reveals positive shift in Tg values with nanoparticles loadings. We used temperature dependent broadband dielectric spectroscopy to gain fundamental insights into the interfacial layer and diffusion dynamics above and below Tg and to establish quantitative microstructure-property correlations. KY NSF EPSCoR REG funding is acknowledged.