Poster Title

Mirror Mirror: A Look into Muscle Dysmorphia

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Clinical and Community Behavioral Health

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Psychology

2nd Student Minor

Clinical and Community Behavioral Health

Institution

Western Kentucky University

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Muscle dysmorphia is a subcategory of body dysmorphia. There is an extreme desire to gain body mass, and this is characterized by many psychological and behavioral symptoms. Previous research has found that mirror checking is a symptom of muscle dysmorphia. The purpose of this study is to continue the investigation into mirror checking as a diagnostic symptom of muscle dysmorphia. Our hypothesis is that participants who score higher on a scale of muscle dysmorphia will spend more time looking in a mirror than those who score low on the scale of muscle dysmorphia. Participants were males enrolled in psychology courses at Western Kentucky University. Participants were placed in front of a mirror and completed three questionnaires regarding levels of muscle dysmorphia, as well as completed one distractor task. The session was recorded in order to code mirror checking behavior. With our findings, we hope to determine the relation between mirror checks and presence of muscle dysmorphia in participants. Data collection is still ongoing and is projected to be finished by December.

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Mirror Mirror: A Look into Muscle Dysmorphia

Muscle dysmorphia is a subcategory of body dysmorphia. There is an extreme desire to gain body mass, and this is characterized by many psychological and behavioral symptoms. Previous research has found that mirror checking is a symptom of muscle dysmorphia. The purpose of this study is to continue the investigation into mirror checking as a diagnostic symptom of muscle dysmorphia. Our hypothesis is that participants who score higher on a scale of muscle dysmorphia will spend more time looking in a mirror than those who score low on the scale of muscle dysmorphia. Participants were males enrolled in psychology courses at Western Kentucky University. Participants were placed in front of a mirror and completed three questionnaires regarding levels of muscle dysmorphia, as well as completed one distractor task. The session was recorded in order to code mirror checking behavior. With our findings, we hope to determine the relation between mirror checks and presence of muscle dysmorphia in participants. Data collection is still ongoing and is projected to be finished by December.