Poster Title

Fruit Characteristics of Kentucky State University’s Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) Advanced Selections

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Major

Agriculture Communications

Institution

Kentucky State University

Department

Agriculture

Abstract

Fruit Characteristics of Kentucky State University’s Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) Advanced Selections

Aidan Thompson*, Jeremiah Lowe, Sheri B. Crabtree, and Kirk William Pomper, College of Agriculture, Communities, and the Environment, Kentucky State University, Cooperative Extension Building, Frankfort KY 40601-2355.

The North American Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is a tree fruit native to the eastern U.S. that is being produced in commercial orchards across the U.S. and internationally. Pawpaw has a small but growing market. Approximately 50 pawpaw cultivars are currently available, with many of these varieties producing low yields with fruit sizes of 120 grams or less. Pawpaw varieties with fruit weighing over 120 grams are considered to have a large enough fruit size for commercial sale and processing. New, high-yielding cultivars with excellent fruit quality would assist with the further development of the pawpaw industry. Kentucky State University serves as the National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Pawpaw. Two goals of the Repository research efforts are germplasm acquisition and evaluation. The repository contains over 2000 accessions from 16 different states; additionally, both open-pollinated seedlings from superior genotypes and crosses of superior selections have been incorporated into the repository collection. Fruit from three KSU advanced selections (Hi 1-4, Hi 4-7, and Hi 7-1) were compared to fruit from the commercially available cultivar ‘Mango’ on the basis of fruit weight, percent seed, soluble solids, and Phyllosticta fungal spot coverage. The selection Hi 1-4 had the largest fruit size, averaging over 240 grams per fruit, the lowest percent seed (7.04%), and a high Brix level (26.41). Hi 4-7 had the highest incidence of Phyllosticta fungal spot, with an average coverage of 40%. Hi 1-4 shows potential to be a promising new release and has been budded onto seedling rootstock for further evaluation.

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Fruit Characteristics of Kentucky State University’s Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) Advanced Selections

Fruit Characteristics of Kentucky State University’s Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) Advanced Selections

Aidan Thompson*, Jeremiah Lowe, Sheri B. Crabtree, and Kirk William Pomper, College of Agriculture, Communities, and the Environment, Kentucky State University, Cooperative Extension Building, Frankfort KY 40601-2355.

The North American Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) is a tree fruit native to the eastern U.S. that is being produced in commercial orchards across the U.S. and internationally. Pawpaw has a small but growing market. Approximately 50 pawpaw cultivars are currently available, with many of these varieties producing low yields with fruit sizes of 120 grams or less. Pawpaw varieties with fruit weighing over 120 grams are considered to have a large enough fruit size for commercial sale and processing. New, high-yielding cultivars with excellent fruit quality would assist with the further development of the pawpaw industry. Kentucky State University serves as the National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Pawpaw. Two goals of the Repository research efforts are germplasm acquisition and evaluation. The repository contains over 2000 accessions from 16 different states; additionally, both open-pollinated seedlings from superior genotypes and crosses of superior selections have been incorporated into the repository collection. Fruit from three KSU advanced selections (Hi 1-4, Hi 4-7, and Hi 7-1) were compared to fruit from the commercially available cultivar ‘Mango’ on the basis of fruit weight, percent seed, soluble solids, and Phyllosticta fungal spot coverage. The selection Hi 1-4 had the largest fruit size, averaging over 240 grams per fruit, the lowest percent seed (7.04%), and a high Brix level (26.41). Hi 4-7 had the highest incidence of Phyllosticta fungal spot, with an average coverage of 40%. Hi 1-4 shows potential to be a promising new release and has been budded onto seedling rootstock for further evaluation.