Poster Title

Correlation Between Testosterone Levels + Pursuit of Percussion in Females

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Music

Minor

Business

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

081

KY Senate District #

34

Department

Caudill College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Abstract

Research suggests that many of the skill sets required of percussionists may come more naturally for high-testosterone individuals. Testosterone’s role in organization of the fetal brain in several places manifests as physiological and psychological characteristics. For example, percussionists are constantly asked to perform skills that involve ambidexterity and coordination between all of their limbs. This requires rigorous communication between the two halves of the brain, which is controlled by the Corpus Callosum, a part of the brain that testosterone aids in developing during the fetal period. Testosterone levels may also impact the way an individual self-identifies on a masculine/feminine scale. Because testosterone is not limited to males, it is possible that a trend of higher testosterone is found in female percussionists. In this study, female percussionists at the collegiate level were given three popular tests that suggest testosterone levels: BEM Sex-Role Inventory, a Self-Identification Survey, and a test of the ratio of the length of the 2nd finger to the 4th finger. The students’ scores were plotted and analyzed against female averages.

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Correlation Between Testosterone Levels + Pursuit of Percussion in Females

Research suggests that many of the skill sets required of percussionists may come more naturally for high-testosterone individuals. Testosterone’s role in organization of the fetal brain in several places manifests as physiological and psychological characteristics. For example, percussionists are constantly asked to perform skills that involve ambidexterity and coordination between all of their limbs. This requires rigorous communication between the two halves of the brain, which is controlled by the Corpus Callosum, a part of the brain that testosterone aids in developing during the fetal period. Testosterone levels may also impact the way an individual self-identifies on a masculine/feminine scale. Because testosterone is not limited to males, it is possible that a trend of higher testosterone is found in female percussionists. In this study, female percussionists at the collegiate level were given three popular tests that suggest testosterone levels: BEM Sex-Role Inventory, a Self-Identification Survey, and a test of the ratio of the length of the 2nd finger to the 4th finger. The students’ scores were plotted and analyzed against female averages.