Poster Title

Can children and young adults read analog clocks? Misconceptions and conceptualization of rotational directionality notation.

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Major

Space Systems Engineering

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

2nd Student Major

Biology

3rd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

3rd Student Major

Psychology

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

78

KY Senate District #

24

Department

Physics, Earth Science & Space Systems Engineering

Abstract

In Kentucky, school math standards for grades 1 and 2 require learning about analog clocks and how to read them. However, recent national and international media reports indicated that an ever increasing proportion of young students may be unable to read these devices because most of the clocks and watches they are familiar with are digital. As analog clocks become less common, students may struggle with conceptualizing the description of rotational direction as clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW), a common description that is essential for physics and chemistry courses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of school students (grades 3-12) and underclassmen college students from Eastern Kentucky to read numbered and numberless analog clocks correctly, and to apply CW/CCW concepts. A standardized survey was completed by participants, and the results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, with a particular emphasis on incorrect responses, which could shed light on potential student misconceptions about reading analog clocks and CW/CCW rotation.

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Can children and young adults read analog clocks? Misconceptions and conceptualization of rotational directionality notation.

In Kentucky, school math standards for grades 1 and 2 require learning about analog clocks and how to read them. However, recent national and international media reports indicated that an ever increasing proportion of young students may be unable to read these devices because most of the clocks and watches they are familiar with are digital. As analog clocks become less common, students may struggle with conceptualizing the description of rotational direction as clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW), a common description that is essential for physics and chemistry courses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of school students (grades 3-12) and underclassmen college students from Eastern Kentucky to read numbered and numberless analog clocks correctly, and to apply CW/CCW concepts. A standardized survey was completed by participants, and the results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, with a particular emphasis on incorrect responses, which could shed light on potential student misconceptions about reading analog clocks and CW/CCW rotation.