Poster Title

James Otis Jr: The Forgotten Patriot

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Social Studies Secondary Education

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

KY House District #

71

KY Senate District #

34

Department

History

Abstract

“James Otis, Jr.: The Forgotten Patriot”

Caroline Coguer

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrea Watkins

“James Otis, Jr.: The Forgotten Patriot” provides an insightful look into American politics during the era of the American Revolution. Born in 1725, Otis was steeped in revolutionary ideals at an early age through his prominent political family, which included his sister Mercy Otis Warren, one of the first women revolutionaries. After graduating from Harvard in 1743, Otis briefly practiced law in Plymouth before returning to Boston where he quickly rose in the ranks of the political and legal scenes. Otis is best known for his passionate challenges to British policies during this time and is widely recognized for his famous challenge to the British Writs of Assistance in 1761 where he spent nearly five hours in a fiery tirade. Historian John T. Morse described this speech as “... the first log of the pile which afterward made the great blaze of the revolution.” Otis is widely recognized for his quote “taxation without representation is tyranny,” which fueled his writings that publicly challenged the Massachusetts royal governor and the British Parliament. Although Otis had great promise to become one of the most celebrated revolutionaries, his life was riddled with mental illness which eventually led to his demise. After a traumatic head injury in 1769 incurred during a fight with a British general in a Boston coffeehouse, he spent the latter half of his life as a recluse before he was killed by a strike of lightning in 1783. Yet, Otis’ life deserves remembrance with the likes of other Founding Fathers for his ideas and zeal for American independence.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

James Otis Jr: The Forgotten Patriot

“James Otis, Jr.: The Forgotten Patriot”

Caroline Coguer

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Andrea Watkins

“James Otis, Jr.: The Forgotten Patriot” provides an insightful look into American politics during the era of the American Revolution. Born in 1725, Otis was steeped in revolutionary ideals at an early age through his prominent political family, which included his sister Mercy Otis Warren, one of the first women revolutionaries. After graduating from Harvard in 1743, Otis briefly practiced law in Plymouth before returning to Boston where he quickly rose in the ranks of the political and legal scenes. Otis is best known for his passionate challenges to British policies during this time and is widely recognized for his famous challenge to the British Writs of Assistance in 1761 where he spent nearly five hours in a fiery tirade. Historian John T. Morse described this speech as “... the first log of the pile which afterward made the great blaze of the revolution.” Otis is widely recognized for his quote “taxation without representation is tyranny,” which fueled his writings that publicly challenged the Massachusetts royal governor and the British Parliament. Although Otis had great promise to become one of the most celebrated revolutionaries, his life was riddled with mental illness which eventually led to his demise. After a traumatic head injury in 1769 incurred during a fight with a British general in a Boston coffeehouse, he spent the latter half of his life as a recluse before he was killed by a strike of lightning in 1783. Yet, Otis’ life deserves remembrance with the likes of other Founding Fathers for his ideas and zeal for American independence.